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On the Ancestors

 

 of JD Eduard Brzorád, a Young Czech member of the Austrian Imperial Council and the Diet of Bohemia.

 

Chronicles of the von Herites, von Krziwanek, Delorme and Brzorád families.

 

 

 

Written by Jan Steinbauer, translation © Mary Petersen

 

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Familie Brzorád

 

 

 

 

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Contents:

The first generations in Chrudim... 6

Jan Brzorád (1623-1675) 6

Samuel Brzorád (1674-1728) 6

Jan Brzorad (1706-1737) 7

Filip Brzorád (1737-1812) and Nymburk. 7

Jan Filip Brzorád, JD et PhD (1765-1851) 19

Adalbert William Brzorád, JD (1767-1839), a provincial governor, president of the Court of Appeal in Galizia. 21

Vincenc/Čeněk Brzorád (1769-1844) Nymburk’s Mayor 23

Božena Němcová‘s Stay (1840-1850) at mayor Antonín Brzorád’s (1809-1877) 27

Bohumil Hrabal about Gustav Brzorád MD (1844-1914) 32

Antonín ‘Gruntorád‘ Brzorád MD (1876-1953) 36

Kateřina Černá née Brzorádová (1771-1831) 42

Josef Calasanz Brzorád (1777-1857), state councilor, owner of Lochkov estate. 44

Correspondence 1807-1811. 45

The Danish princess visiting Lochkov. 58

Stammbuch für Anna Brzorád. 59

The painter Thorald Læssøe at Lochkov. 61

From the diary of Tomáš Černý JD (1840-1909), a lawyer in Prague and the nephew of Josef Brzorád. 73

Philippine Brzorádová (1812-1886) 77

Karl Brzorád (1813-1871), the owner of the Lochkov estate. 81

Tulka the painter and Augusta Brzorádová (1873-1879) 91

The Memories of Dobříč and Lochkov by Prague. 98

Vilém Brzorád JD (1814-1898), advocate and owner of a brick factory. 112

Marie Hauptmannová née Brzorádová (1818-1888) 129

Ferdinand Brzorád (1821-1863), deputy judge to the country court in Prague. 137

Rudolf J. Brzorád (1823-1890), owner of the estate and a mine in Hungary. 140

Anna Erben née Brzorád (1833-1865), friend of Kateřina Fügner 149

Eduard Ferdinand Brzorád JD (1820-1898) 157

Marie Komers née Brzorádová (1861-1920) 187

Karla Kratochvílová née Brzorádová (1868-1937) 191

Anna Dostálová roz. Brzorádová (1876-1919) 194

Eduard Brzorád Jr., JD (1856-1904) 202

 

 

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Introduction

 

We begin the Family history of Brzorád’s with an impecuniousšlotýř[1] Jan Brzorád (1623-1675) from Kovářov, who later settled in Chrudim.  His son, who rented a nearby mill in Májov also lived there.  Two generations later, the mill was purchased by Filip Brzorád  (1623-1675), who in 1766 boldly and with debt bought the mill in Nymburk and developed it into the largest mill in the country.  Besides other properties in Nymburk he bought a house nr. 627 in Prague’s Týnská street, which he gave to his eldest son JUDr. and PhDr. (doctor of law and philosophy) Jan Filip (1765-1851), who later became the Lord of the Chlum and Vidovice estate, and in 1848 a member of „St. Wenceslas committee of 1848“[2], later of The National Committee.  Jan Filip’s son Joseph (1810 -1898) was a provincial deputy.

         Filip the miller (1623-1675), however, also provided for  his second son JD Adalbert Wilhelm (1767-1839), a lawyer, the provincial governor and president of the appellate court in Galicia.  Filip had two daughters: Marie (*1774), who married prof. Jan Nejedlý and Catherine (1771-1831), who married Tomáš Černý, and became the mother of a prominent Prague mayor JD Tomáš Černý (1840-1909).  Filip’s third son was Vincent Brzorád (1769-1844), the mayor of the city of Nymburk.  Family members of the Brzoráds and the Černýs can be found among the members of the National Guard in 1848.

         The writer Božena Němcová, during her stay in Nymburk in the years 1848-1850, lived at Vincent’s son Antonín’s (1809-1877), also a mayor.  . When poverty fell on her later on, the Brzoráds were among those who willingly helped. The Brzorád’s children together with the Černý’s children spent lots of time with the writer and her four children.  Among these was Gustl, the future MUDr. Gustav Brzorád (1844-1917), who is remembered in a text by Bohumil Hrabal as well as his son MUDr. Antonín Brzorád, who was immortalized in Hrabal’s novel Postřižiny as Dr. Gruntorád.

         The successful Nymburk’s miller Filip (1623-1675) had two more sons. Filip (1776-1882), the fourth son, of the same name, drowned unfortunately, at the age of six in the millrace while playing with a ball.  Filip’s last son, Josef (1777-1857), however, lived to an old age.  It was for him that his father bought the estate of Lochkov near Prague.  Because the amount of meadows and forests did not seem sufficient to him, Filip bought some more land in Smíchov, across the river from Vyšehrad and a coal mine.  Josef (“Kalasánský” - named after a major saint Joseph Calasanz) went to the Piaristshigh school with the Czech poet and linguist, and a leading figure of the Czech National Revival, Joseph Jungman and after studying the law he worked in state administration.  But after 1808 he moved to the Lochkov estate, to whose management he was devoted until his death – and thanks to his education he also exercised jurisdiction there.  There he built a nice mansion with a chapel.  The preserved letters document his relationship with his wife Anna Delorme and her interesting family who owned Dienzenhofer’s palace, today called Portheimka in Smíchov.  In his letter from 1811 for example we read instructions on how to pronounce the name Brzorád properly.

         Josef’s love was science - his meteorological observations were written down 3 times daily for 40 years.  He had an extensive library.  He exchanged letters in Czech with his father, but with his wife, children and brothers in German.  But from his children he demanded Czech language skills and otherwise felt warmly Czech.  He was among the supporters of the National Museum and among the founders of Matice Česká[3], although following the advice of Josef Jungmann he had his son Vilém listed as such. JD Vilém Brzorád (1814-1898) who later became a lawyer and administrator, and a tenant of the Jinonice estate.  Among the friends of Lochkov’s Brzoráds were revivalists and participants in the revolutionary year of 1848, prof. Helcelet and philosopher Hanuš.  They socialized mainly with Vilém and his brother Karl (1813-1871), who had numerous offsprings and later took over the Lochkov estate and soon sold it.

         Rare are the memories of the fate of Vilém's grandson Jan (1883-1970), a leading figure of national economic life in pre-war Czechoslovakia, who was at the age of 72 imprisoned for six years by the Communists.  Equally important are references to the lives of his sons Jiří, an X-ray mammography specialist (nicknamed "Dr. Prsorád[4]”) and Vilém, a leading exiled lawyer, politician and economist active in the Committee for Free Europe and in the magazine Svědectví, who was awarded state honors from the hands of Václav Havel.  His daughter is the prominent ballet dancer Nina Brzorad.

         Karl’s daughters were governesses and one of them was the love of National Theatre’s painter Josef Tulka.  Another of his daughters wrote vivid memories of her life at Lochkov. 

         Other children of Josef’s were Ferdinand, adjutant of the Provincial Court in Prague, a daughter Philippa, who, after the death of their mother took care of the household, a daughter Marie, whose offspring Goppolt von Nordenegg achieved ennoblement, and a son Rudolph, who from his aunt Delorme inherited the estate Mogyorós in Hungary with a coal mine.  He was very rich and even set up a port named Brzorád on the Danube in Pest.  His son Julius was a distinguished sculptor and took the name Gyula Bezerédi; Rudolf’s second son and namesake - Rudolf’s (Rösze) descendants - still live under the name Bozorády .

         This work will focus on the last son born in Lochkov -  Eduard Ferdinand (1820-1898), who after studying law - first in Prague in the same year as FL Rieger, then at the University of Vienna - became a lawyer and notary in Německý Brod. Later, he became a district mayor and a Knight of the Order of Franz Joseph.  He corresponded with his friend Josef A. baron Helfert, later an Austrian minister and he was a close friend of Vojtěch Weidenhoffer.  With Marie née von Křivánek he had three daughters and a son.

         The daughter Karla became the mother of the Minister of Industry and Trade in the Protectorate government, JD Jaroslav Kratochvíl; the daughter Anna and her husband emigrated to the US, where they actively assisted in the birth of an independent Czechoslovak state – her husband JD Hynek Dostál, editor, Knight of the Orders of St. Gregory and of St. George and the holder of the papal awards "Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice" and "Pro Ecclesia et Fide", cosigned the Pittsburgh Agreement in 1918.  The grandson of the daughter Marie, who married the District Governor Komers, became an employee in the secretariat of the Presidium of the Supreme Court in the era of Emil Hácha, whom he respected.

          We will also observe the private, political and community life of the only son, Eduard, a Young Czech Party’s member, politician and a radical nationalist, otherwise also a lawyer and mayor of the town and the district.

         Finally, we briefly mention the fate of those he left behind as dependents, after his unexpectedly early demise.  His wife Vlasta, a telegraph operator and the daughter of a “k.u.k.” telegraph supervisor, became a postmistress; her two sons Jaromír and Eduard were also in mail services.  Future generations would also remain in telecommunications and freight services.

 

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The first generations in Chrudim

 

Jan Brzorád (1623-1675)

Jan Brzorád from the small village of Kovářov, the estate of Nasavrky, was the grandfather of the family clan.  He is listed that way on the marriage certificate, a copy of which is, along with many other copies of baptismal and death certificates and letters of the oldest Brzorád’s, preserved in the National Museum Archive.  Kovářov was not big - in 1667 numbering only 75 souls.  Later we find Brzoráds in Chrudim.  In the inventory of subjects according to their faith[5], which was conducted in 1651 we read: "John Brzorád 28 years, Catholicsojourner (live-in farm labourer), šlotýř  in Chrudim, quarter - Bohatá".  Jan Brzorád apparently did not belong among the rich. Masaryk’s Encyclopaedia said this aboutšlotýř”: "šlotýř (also šrotýř, skladčí, líhař) an old Czech name for laborers who drove lumber and malt, delivered the beer and wine, rolling and lowering barrels on skids - timber joined together."  In 1654[6] Jan married Kateřina, the daughter of Jan Kope(r)náč from Chrudim.  In that year, as recorded in Chrudim’s town books, Kateřina and he bought a “Vobořilovský“ house N. 11 / III. in St. Catharina’s district, next door to a neighbor Jiří, also a “šrotýřfor 235 zl. (Gulden).  About 1675 the city book says: "12 of June the guardians of the late Jan Brzorád’s  children sold theVobořilovský“ house with a garden and a barn next to the house of Petr Tauš to the stepfather of the chidlren, Daniel Holub and his wife Kateřina."  The house had already been calledBrzorádovský” - Brzorád’s and the heirs finally sold it in 1697 for 166 zl.[7]

 

Samuel Brzorád (1674-1728)

Jan's son Samuel Karel also lived in Chrudim[8].  He was just two years old at the time of his father's funeral.  Fathers died to small Brzoráds in other generations.  Samuel was born in 1674 and in 1703 he married Anna Šlemová (Šlemeriana) from Chrudim.  He was probably a miller and a tenant of Májov’s mill.[9]  It was at the time when the mill belonged to Count František Josef Schönfeld.  Today, we can see the mill No. 148 / IV in the form it received in the mid-19th century.  The same owner owned also an adjacent courtyard with the flat in a manorial flat number 147 / IV.  After Samuel the courtyard was rented by Jan Makalouš.  Later Samuel's grandson Philip bought the mill.  In 1707, Samuel bought a 'house in Chrudim for 175 zl..  It was in the district Putrkaská, nr. 105 / IV " lying on the right hand side, alongside municipal bridges along the way from local brewery to Putrkasy.”  After Samuel's death in 1728 his son Jan Brzorád took over the house (according to the debated inheritance) for 233 zl. 20 crowns.  Jan's brother, Samuel Brzorád,  a soldier gave his justice (his rightful share) 178 zl. 53 crowns to Jan when leaving Bohemia.

 

Jan Brzorad (1706-1737)

Jan was born three years after the wedding in 1706.  He married Anna, the daughter of Jan Wolf of Chrudim, when he was 21.  He did not live long, as he died at the age of 31 on December 3, 1737.  So it was a close shave that one of the most enterprising Brzoráds, father of numerous offspring and a significant generation of the family, Filip Vojtěch Jakub was born at all.  House No. 105 / IV., worth 233 zl. 20 kr, was taken after Jan Brzorad by the widow Anna Brzoradova  in. January 17, 1744.

 

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Filip Brzorád (1737-1812) and Nymburk

Vojtech Filip Jakub Brzorád was born just two weeks before his father's death – on November 17, 1737. On the 10th of September 1761 he bought Májov’s mill Number 148 / IV.[10], which has already been mentioned, because this mill on the Chrudimka river, just outside of Chrudim, was already rented by Philip's grandfather Samuel. This notation in the town of Chrudim’s books is worth reading:  " Nr. 148 district IV. -  On September 10, 1761 Alžběta Koblíková sold a mill with one weir, triple construction and a crusher, situated by Májov’s farmyard, to which it formerly belonged, and which is now in possession of the seller, with an attached little barn, 14 korec 3 věrtel[11] (over 4 ha) and a quarter of a field, a little vineyard and the surroundings of the mill for 3150 zl. to Philip Brzorád. It is natural that by the mill some farm buildings were also built since there were also fields."[12]

 

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Agricultural farmyard Nr. 147 / IV , adjacent to Májov’s mill.[13]

 

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Agricultural farmyard Nr. 147 / IV , adjacent to Májov’s mill.[14]

 

On 17the November 1761 Philip Brzorád, who is already a miller in Májov, married Ludmila Všetečková from Chrudim. She was related to the Všetečkas from Nymburk, later pharmacists in Chrudim and in Poděbrady.

 

Nymburk (1766)[15]

On the 7th of June 1766 Filip Brzorád together with his wife Ludmila born Všetečková bought a mill from Jan Šulc in Nymburk’s auction " ... because, after all the festivities had gone they did not find anyone else who would pay more for the mill than Brzorád was willing to give.  From the purchase price the debts were paid to the urban funds, contributions, attorney's fees 60zl and other debts. The rest of the price was handed to Marie Magdalena Schwarz, who had insured 5628 zl. 20 krowns on the mill.  The Brzoráds insured part of this debt to Schwarz at their mill in Chrudim, purchased for 3150zl from Alžběta Koblíková."[16]  First they leased it (the mill in Nymburk), then they bought it, rebuilt and modernized it so it became the largest in the country.[17]

 

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A coloured view of Brzorád’s mill at around 1840, „Gez. und Lit. C. W. Arldt Malerishe Partie in Nimburg[18]

 

In the interior of the Nymburk Municipal Mill, which was owned by Filip Brzorad in 1766-1807. "On the wooden beam we find two inscription cartridges “LETA PANNE MDCCLXXXVII NAKLADEMPANA BRZORADAFILIPA”, meaning “Anno Domini MDCCLXXXVII  andFinanced by Mister FILIP BRZORAD.”[19]

 

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In the interior of the Nymburk Municipal Mill, which was owned by Filip Brzorad in 1766-1807. "On the wooden beam we find two inscription cartridges “LETA PANNE MDCCLXXXVII NAKLADEMPANA BRZORADAFILIPA”, meaning “Anno Domini MDCCLXXXVII” and “Financed by Mister FILIP BRZORAD.”[20]

 

 

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Nymbursk’s mill - Stammhaus der Brzoradbased on an old drawing.[21]

 

An entry of the inventory of houses and their owners in Nymburk from year 1772 says “Fillip Brzorad, Mlinaržmeaning “F.B. the miller”.[22]

 

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the inventory of houses and their owners in Nymburk from year 1772 says “Fillip Brzorad, Mlinaržmeaning “F.B. the miller”.[23]

 

 August 26, 1773 Filip Brzorád sold Májov’s mill near Chrudim Nr. 148 , District IV. and its accessories to Václav Všetečka, for his son František, as Brzorád bought it, for 3500 zl in cash.[24]  We know that the Všetečkas from Chrudim were related through Philip's wife Ludmila.

 

In 1774 Phillip’s daughter Marie Brzorádová was born, who later married Professor Jan Nejedlý from Chrudim.  William Brzorád mentioned him later as a councilor to the magistrate of Český Brod.[25]  They had a son Antonín, who married Josefa Bergmannova.

 

In 1775 the Brzorád couple bought a house no. 165 (also known as Hlavovský or Kadeřávkovský) in Nymburk  together "with a beer court – a brew place at the back of the house".

 

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Nymburk house No. 165 (on the left), Renaissance town hall (on the right) in 2006

 

21 April 1776 was born and on September 1st 1776, Phillip’s son Philip Brzorád died in Nymburk.

 

In 1777 in Nymburk for us the most important Brzorád - son Joseph (1777-1857 ) was born.  To him we will devote the next section.

 

In 1779 in Nymburk Philip’s second son Philip and daughter Anna were born. Anna, however, died four years later in 1783 and Philip drowned in Nymburk at six years of age in 1785, when he tried to catch a ball with which he was playing and fell into the Elbe, “Filip Brzorád ertrank als Knabe in der Elbe, als er beim Ballspiele nach dem hineingefallenen Ball haschte.“[26]

 

In 1784 Philip Brzorád rented nearly 46 měr[27] (over 8 ha) of municipal land for a small amount, but with a payment of permanent interest to the municipal retirement.

 

From the year 1791 there is a purchase contract on fields for Ph. Jak. Brzorád for 590zl.[28].  In the same year - in 1791, the Nymburk town councillor Fil. Jak. Brzorád Nymburk bought a house 627/7 in Prague’s Týnská Street.  "In this house there is a very spacious old great hall, now built up, but should be restored; there is an arcaded way being planned to unclog the street"[29]  Apparently, shortly before 1800 there was a major renovation carried out by Philip Heger, who owned the house from 1777.[30]

 

Praha, Staré Město, Týnská street, house nr.  627/7, photo by JS in 2017

 

 

In 1792 Filip Brzorád sold a farm house N 227 in the Nymburk suburbs of St. George (today Tyršova 29) to Vincent and his bride for 2,750 zl..  In the same year he bought for 1,250 gold coins house No. 237 (now demolished).  From the year 1795 there is a contract for the purchase of land at St. George for 3030 zl.[31]

 

In 1796 at an auction his son in-law Tomáš Černý bought the neighboring yard nr. 236 (old No. 8) with a barn, a building, a garden and a piece of field for 710 zl.

 

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Purchase Agreement from 1796[32]

 

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The detail of Filip Brzorád’s seal on the purchase contract from 1796[33]

 

In the same year - the year 1796 - for 9.000zl the Councillor Philip Brzorád, an inspector, with his wife bought the Švechníř’s farmyard Nr. 243.  This, at that time – a farmyard, will be, after the great fire of 1838, rebuilt by Philip’s son Vincent to include the house with the famous garden ( now a park of Dr. Antonín Brzorád) , in which the grandson of Philip, Antonín Brzorád hosted Božena Němcová.  For more see the section "Vincent Brzorád, Božena Němcova in Nymburk."  A three-page contract with all fields and meadows listed, and a detailed description of the house was drafted to cover this purchase.  At the bottom of the contract we find the seal and signatures of both spouses.

 

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Detail of the contract from 1796: "Filip Brzorád the buyer and Lidmila Brzorádová born Všetečková the buyer

 

In Nymburk’s archive there is also a contract covering a purchase of a quarry from 1801. [34]

 

In 1805 Filip Brzorád signed a municipality's document as "Philip Brzorád, the councilor".

 

On the 18th of January 1806 Ludmila Brzorádová born Všetečková dies.

 

1807 Filip Brzorád sold the mill (in Nymburk, purchased in 1766 ) for 120.000zl. „The mill was assigned as an inheritance to Vincent (Čeněk); His wife, however, declared: "I do not want to be a miller’s wife"; to which the grandfather said, "So I will sell the mill ..." and so he did and the kids evenly shared the proceeds.  Dessen Frau hatte sich aber hören lassenIch will keine Müllerin sein“; worauf der Grossvater sagte: „so werde ich die Mühle  verkaufen …“ und tat es auch, um die Kinder gleich mässig zu beteilen.”[35]

 

1808 Filip Brzorád bought the “free hold” Lochkov manor near Prague from Alois Arioli for 134,000 gulden.  Arioli bought the farm in 1804 from Ferdinand Delorme.

 

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Lochkov castle, image from the yard taken in 2002

 

Filip Brzorád died on 25th of January 1812.  His grandson, William Brzorád (1814-1898) wrote: "Grandpa Philip James was healthy, strong and energetic, also an affectionate father and husband, clever and prudent.  Mother told us that the night before the sale (or rather the purchase) of Nymburk mill he asked his wife Liduska for advice.  Should they dare buy the mill, even though the expense exceeded their assets.  He decided in favour of the purchase because they were known for the profitability of their trading, diligence and knowledge of business matters.  When he purchased Lochkov he realized that there was lack of meadows and woods.  Therefore he quickly bought Smíchov’s meadow[36] and two coal mines in "Pulep"(?).  He talked about his sons to my mother;  Then he put on one name such an emphasis that one knew which one (Adalbert) was his favorite.  From the letter, which Adalbert wrote after grandfather's death to my father, one can see how deep his grief was. [37]  

 

In 1813 the heirs, dividing the assets in the sum 117,180zl.52 Kr, left the house (Nr. 165 in Nymburk) to brother Vincent.  The assets, except that of the house were: dominical house Nr. 237 worth 6261 zl, a house in Prague Nr 627 worth 4000zl. (Týnská 7), about 30 morgens[38] (cca 18ha) of fields and the rest in cash and in debts of his neighbors and elsewhere.  In that year's inventory of the Nymburk houses Philip’s son Vincent  Brzorád is listed as the owner of house numbers 165 (with registered 2 people), 243, 246 and 247.

 

Philip Brzorád is remembered once more in a letter in German from his grandson, William, "Both grandfathers[39] were men who raised themselves with their own power from a low status and were able to provide their children with good education and a decent provision at which they have been successfully supported by their wives.  In 1866 Filip Brzorád was a tenant of a small mill on the Chrudimka river (Májov) under Chrudim.  That year he rented Nymburk’s mill on the River Elbe, and a few years later bought it and built it into one of the largest and best-equipped mills in the country.  He led his business to such a great success that he was able to educate and provide well for his 4 sons and 2 daughters. ... Philip Jakub Brzorád was also an advocate (der Anwalt) of the town of Nymburk and won public merit in times of the need for water and during fires.[40]  He knew the German language to such an extent that he could use it in the office and his business.  His children corresponded with him and he with them only in Czech.... Grandfather Brzorád did not have the opportunity of scientific education, but his head and heart were in the right place.  He wrote once to his son Vojtěch: “The last time you drove through Český Brod, without ever visiting your brother in law and sister.” I know that you don’t like them, and I do not blame you. But don’t do it any more because it would be an insult to your good sister." [41] 

 

Philip descendants are therefore four sons: Jan Philip (1765-1851), William Vojtech (1767-1839), Vincent (1769-1844) and Joseph (1777-1857) and two daughters Marie Nejedlý and Kateřina  Černý (1771-1831).

 

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Jan Filip Brzorád, JD et PhD (1765-1851)

JUDr. et PhDr.[42] Jan Filip Brzorád (1765-1851) was born in 1765 in Chrudim.  He was a provincial lawyer in Prague.  In 1813 he inherited a house from his father, nr. 128 in Týnská street in Prague (now nr. 627/7) worth 4000 gulden.  There his brother Joseph also registered his stay in 1805[43].  In 1811 during Josef’s wedding ceremony in the Smíchov church Jan Filip served as his witness.

         From 1812 (when his father died), Jan Filip was the owner of an agricultural estate in Chlum and Vidovice[44].  He married Eleanor Holanová, daughter of the owner of an estate in Unhošť - Hofbesitzertochter.  Dr. Jan Brzorád was named among the members of the St. Wenceslas’ committee of 1848“, later of The National Committee.[45]

         His nephew said about him: " Jan, the eldest son of my grandfather, was extremely diligent in his studies, always an excellent student who became a doctor of law and philosophy. ... At first he was the owner and administrator of the estate in Zbuzany, then the Hadovka vineyards, later for an extended period of time the manager (Wirtschafter) of the estate Chlum and Vidovice and finally manager in Vysočany, where he died in 1851.  Phlegmatic "come il faut" he left the household decision making to his wife and helped only with decisions about the sale of grain. ... He corresponded in German, with my father (Vilém’s father Josef) and with Grandpa in Czech. We visited them, as far as I remember once a year.  He was large and strong, as were his wife and their children: Ludmila (1794-1878), Filip (1799-1873) and Josef Jan (1810-1899)."[46]

         Ludmila (1794-1878), married Johann Boržicky, an administrative clerk in Nemysl(?) by Čechtice.  Their son Johann was the owner of the farm estate Wollowitz[47]  and married Emma Pokorny in 1848.  Ludmila’s daughter Eleanore (*1820) married Emanuel Daubek, a postmaster in Čechtice.  Their children were Johann (*1845), a postexpeditor in Čechtice, Eleonore (*1848), Emanuel (*1849), Franz (*1850), a technician, Ludmilla (*1852) and Betty (*1856).  Ludmila’s daughter Rosalie died in 1841.

         Filip (1799-1873) was an official valuator for the land registry in Prague. the postmaster in Gonobitz.  One of their daughters, Františka, married a municipal architect in Krakow Marles Robel and their son was an engineer; the second daughter Luisa married a geodetic engineer, in Prague, Václav Mikeš.  The third daughter Johanna married a geodetic engineer in Hungary, J. Wallenfels.  Filip’s only son Josef "Peppi" Richard Brzorád (1846-1918) - he added the name Richard at the wedding - graduated from engineering and chemistry and was a tax official at a sugar plant in Jičín, later k.u.k. financial inspector, retired and died in Prague. He probably had no offspring.[48]

         Josef Jan Brzorád (1810-1899) was the landowner in Chlum and Vidovice beginning in 1840.  He also inherited a house in Týnská street in Prague, and was a member of the Bohemian provincial parliament.  For many years he held the office of the mayor of the district; he was the chairman of the economic association in Jílové, enjoying the reputation of an honest patriot.  He died on 13 July 1899 in Kosova Hora at Baron Mladota's castle, and was buried in Mnichovice.[49]  In 1835 he married the daughter of the postmaster Doubek / Daubek from Votice.  Their only daughter Eleanora married Lieutenant Rudolf Kainz, with whom she had seven children, and inherited estates in Chlum and Vidovice.  In 1894 they sold the farm to Jan and Marie Milner, who in 1904 made the most important building modifications of the castle.  In 1906 the mansion was referred to as "the newly built castle with a park".[50]  Their children were Alfred *1854, Friedrich *1860, Adele *1863, Marie *1865, Leontine (*1868 in Vidovice, oo Bernhard Zechner, later Oberstudiendirector in Rumburg, + 1955 Tutzing, near Munich[51]), Zdenka *1870 and Anna *1871.[52]

 

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Adalbert William Brzorád, JD (1767-1839), a provincial governor, president of the Court of Appeal in Galizia

Born in Nymburk in 1767 JUDr. Adalbert William Brzorád (1767-1839), was the provincial governor and the councilor to the court of appeal in Galizia, a lawyer and president of the Bar Association in Czernowitz, Bukovina and a Prague citizen.  He married Eleanor Kemper (+1848 in Chernowitz).  Adalbert’s nephew, William Brzorád (1814-1898) recalls his uncle, "He was my strongest and most talented uncle.  He was very ambitious, an excellent lawyer, attorney in Poděbrady, then Magistrate Councilor in Krakow, councilor to the Court of Appeal in Lvov (Galicia), and finally the president of the provincial court in Czernowitz (Bukovina), where he died in retirement.”  His tombstone can still be found in the catholic cemetery.[53]  “He was my godfather.  On his way to Karlsbad in 1833 and 1834 he stopped each time for a week in Lochkov.  He corresponded with my father only in German.  His letters are interesting because of remarks he made about the local social conditions and historical events.  To his father he wrote in Czech.  Adalbert Wilhelm (1767-1839) had two children, Antonia Laura(1816-1902) and Adalbert (+1879).

         The daughter Antonia Laura (1816-1902) married a Polish landowner in in Ober-Scheroutz / Scheronitz[54], who probably also had some land in Kuschwarda,[55] Josef von Zadurovič / Zadurowicz. Antonia corresponded with William Brzorád (1814-1898) and used to go to Karlsbad.[56]  Her letters are funny and well informed, and are therefore quite fun to read.  Their son Adalbert Ritter von Zadurowicz - Vojtěch von Zadurovič[57] (1838-1915) was a "wealthy" owner of the farm in Bukovina and to his mother he paid an annuity of 3.000zl. He would meet William Brzorád. He died childless and single in Vienna.  In 1888 after she was widowed, the landlady of Kushwarda /KušvardaAntonie von Zadurowicz (1816-1902) married the local mayor Heinrich Rak (1828-1901).[58]

 

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von Zadurowicz and Wilhelm Brzorád in Czernowitz 1853[59]

 

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von Zadurowicz’s coat of arms[60]

 

         Adalbert Wilhelm’s son Adalbert / Vojtěch Brzorád (+1879) got a farm estate, Buneška, from his father.  As the landlord in Bukovina, he was somewhat profligate “der etwas messailiert war.”  He had two daughters[61] and his two sons became depraved as a result of irregular dissolute life in Sučava (mainly German dist. city in Bukovina) "... Söhne verkommen infolge unregelmässigen Lebens in Suczawa.”[62]  His two sons were Adalbert / Vojtěch and Kazimír, the daughters were: Jeanetta, who married Stefanovitz (they had a son Stefan), Josefine, Klaudine, who married Mandjezenski (they had 3 daughters: Josefina, Veronika Dr., Marie, who married Bella) and Albertina, who married Kalumerský (they had 3 sons: Trojan, Mikon, Eugen).[63]

 

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Vincenc/Čeněk Brzorád (1769-1844) Nymburk’s Mayor

Vincenc / Čeněk Brzorád (1769-1844) was born in Nymburk in 1769; he later became the owner of a prominent town farm, Nymburk’s mayor and the founder of an important family branch of Nymburk.  He was Philip's third son and, unlike his brothers he stayed in Nymburk.  In 1799 he married Antonie Pokorná, the daughter of Nymburk’s administrator.  In the 1812‘s list of homeowners (and after his father's death), the following numbers are given for Vincenc Brozrad: No. 165 (2l), 243 (zu 165), 246 (zu 165), 247 (zu 165).  So he owned four houses.  He provided well for 3 sons and 3 daughters.  After a great fire in 1838, he rebuilt the farm yard No. 243 on today's Boleslavská Street.  He died in 1844.  His nephew Vilém Brzorad (1814-1898) remembers him: "Vincenc, in his time a wealthy burgher, ... was bright and good-natured.  He had three daughters and three sons: Philip (1803-1871), Vincenc / Čeněk (1813-1870) and Antonin (1809-1877), all of whom lived and died in Nymburk."[64]

 

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Vincenc Brzorád (1769-1844) [65]

 

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Nymburk, Boleslavská street, nr. 243, Brzorád‘s house[66]

 

         A token was found in the field west of Slaný (Kladno District).  The inscription on the coin says "Čenek Brzorad" and on the other side is the city emblem of Nymburk.  So it probably comes from the time when "our" Čeněk Brzorád held the office of mayor.  A 25-mm in diameter chip was found and sent by Mr. Ronald Tax.  The exact purpose of the token though will yet have to be looked into. [67]

 

 

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25-mm in diameter chip with ČENEK BRZORAD [68]around his initials

 

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25-mm in diameter chip showing the coat of arms of the town of Nymburk[69]

 

 

         Philip (1803-1871), an official, belonged to the circle of Božena Němcová’s acquntances in Nymburk and was the commander of the National Guard of Nymburk.  He married Antonie Černá - a little later at the age 43 - and had a son, "who has earned and spent a lot of money in Prague." [70]

         Čeněk (1813-1870) is unfortunately also worth mentioning, because his son Čeněk Filip (1845-1884) was mentioned by The New York Times on July 6, 1884. In Foreign Gossip and Facts, we find the following text: „The city Engineer of Prague, one M. Brzorad, who was unmarried, 41 years of age, and who lived alone, was murdered a fortnight ago by an artilleryman, aged 24, and of good family, who avowed that he had committed the crime out of jealousy.  Brzorad was found lying in his own house, with his throat cut and several deep dagger stabs in his chest.“[71]

 

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Purkmistrovský kord (Muzeum Nymburk)

 

         The third Čeněk’s son - Antonín Brzorád (1809-1877) was also the mayor of Nymburk; the writer Božena Němcová lived in his house.  This is discussed in more detail below in the chapter " Božena Němcová‘s Stay (1840-1850) at mayor Antonín Brzorád’s (1809-1877). With his wife Františka Messner he had two daughters and a son Gustav.  The daughter Theresa married Gustav Klazar, Supreme Judicial Councillor in Prague; Fanny, the second daughter (+28, 2, 1937, 98 years old) married Karl Theer and their son Otokar Theer (1880-1917), a Czech poet and novelist, who used the pseudonym Otto Gulon was born in Černovice in Bukovina.  He wrote books such as Under the Tree of Love, Expeditions to Me or Faethon.

 

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Božena Němcová‘s Stay (1840-1850) at mayor Antonín Brzorád’s (1809-1877)

 

The writer Božena Němcová’s [72]stay in Nymbursk is described in detail by Jan Vondráček in his book from 193[73]. The author draws on detailed knowledge of the facts and memories of B. Němcová’s daughter. Let's quote this book directly:

         "The Němec’s found an apartment with a large open-air kitchen on the Boleslavská road, on the ground floor of Mr. Antonín Brzorád’s house No. 243; if you came in from the courtyard, it was on the left. The house was built by the former mayor Vincenc Brzorad after the devastating fire of 1838, which destroyed much of the city. They used the construction materials from the demolished Boleslavská gateway, standing nearby. If Němcová was satisfied with her apartment, we do not know, but from the note to Konopa, where she says, "Whenever I look out of the window, I have no prospect in the landscape, only on the road," we think she wanted a more open view. There in the suburbian house in the midst of the gardens and fields, she set up a cozy home, where she spent a year and a half at work with worries, in joy and in sadness. The house of the Němecs was modest but cozy. The furniture was plain but tasteful. A simple sofa with a raised bolster, without backs and pillows, covered in green molded plush, four stuffed chairs of the same color - a part of Němcova's trousseau - a round table with one foot with a glued landscapes on the top plate under a varnish coat - the wedding gift from the bride groom to his bride and bookshelves were the most significant pieces of furniture. Němcová used to write at the round table. The flat was also furnished with a well used, fairly good piano, a library with busts of our famous men, and on the walls hung portraits of Czech writers and Němcová’s friends.

 

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Boleslavská nr. 243, Brzorád’s house from the yard[74]

 

At the house there was a garden and a large yard, just like today (1913) where the children played. The house was home to poultry and there was a new world of observation and experience for children. Němcová also kept a dog Ořech and a canary in her household for the pleasure of children. Each of the Němec children had one of their own hens that they cared for. Dora had the totally black, tame little hen who walked behind her like a dog. A window full of flowers that Nemcova loved and looked after with love, looked out on the dusty Boleslavská road. The beautiful, young lady, not yet thirty, surrounded by four small, carefully raised children, of whom the oldest Hynek was a ten-year-old, the youngest Jaroslav six-year-old, ruled in this household as a queen, completely independent and free.

 

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Boleslavská č. p. 243, pohled na dům s bránou z ulice Velké Valy[75]

 

... The relationship of Božena Němcová to her husband is still mysterious. We can say that it was not the way it should have been, but we must not judge the whole cohabitation from individual sharp outcomes; as we have numerous evidence against Němec, we find much evidence in his favour and Němcová writes about her husband once one way, the next time the other way. With increasing affection, B. Němcová clung to her cute, promising children. Love for children has replaced all of her disappointing desires and often protected her from despair. She also expresses this in her first poem To Czech Wives, “the husband does not have everything but a slender, weak woman does, just her heart and - her child."[76] She was a kind and exemplary mother, and the children adored her. She did not fuss about them, but did not spoil them either. She dressed them tastefully and guided them led to refined behavior. She did not allow them to frolic outside with the naughty youngsters and kept them at home and allowed them to invite some good male and female classmates. Here the children would read various fairy tales and books for the youth. Němcová explained, if something was not clear to them, she lectured them, played the piano for them, while the children were singing along. Thus, with her extraordinarily kind and pleasant nature she won over not only the hearts of her children but also those of strangers. Among those who would come to the Němec’s were the landlord’s children (the Brzoráds), two daughters - twins, and son Gustl (now dr. Gustav Brzorad), because they liked it more with the Němecs than at home upstairs. The boys would bring their classmates Ziebig (son of the police inspector), Kulich's boys from Bašta, Jeník Černý. Dora brought Kalinka Dlabačova, (later prof. Emler’s wife), Zdenka Havelkova (later President of the Czech Academy of Sciences’s president Josef Hlávka’s wife ) and others. That was how Němcová chased away her loneliness warming her heart on the sweet love of children when her husband was on business trips or went to the "Pelikan" inn, where he used to play cards.“[77]

 

Nymburk inspired Němcová to write an autobiographical novel "Coffee Society", a caricature of the germanized language of the 19th century.” There was a brief, but unusually accurate description of the spirit of the better circles of that time, where the mayor’s wife, doctor' wife, councilor’s wife, pharmacist’s wife, etc. would set the tone. (Here, perhaps, someone would have wanted specific names, but from a critical point of view, in is utterly uninteresting that in 1848), the mayor was Jan Zedrich, and after him (from 1848) Antonin Brzorad, the councilor was Gabriel, the pharmacist was Všetečka, etc. They are the types, not the reality. "[78]..." We can see their haughtiness and pride as they look upon the other plebeians, craftsmen, tradesmen, etc. upon the rabble that when they have a few groshen[79], they want to climb higher than a man who has "bildung"[80]. We hear their talk, bad German, even worse Czech and we recognize that in spite of all of their announced education, their horizons are narrow, bounded by interest in the most boring gossip.” But Němcová was not just disappointed in the people of Nymburk: " There was this closed, defamatory society of the town’s ladies who looked upon Němcová, who would shudder at her behaviour and who would judge her one-sidedly. But apart from these and many other adversaries, … there was a whole circle of our writer's sincere friends. They were the men and women mentioned in the letter to Mrs. Čelakovská: "There are Czechs here and I am happy about it ( she came there from the German Všeruby). There are also some zealous patriots and female patriots here."

 

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Božena Němcová in 1850 (drawing in pencil by V. Misliweček)[81]

 

The first of Němcová’s acquaintance was certainly her landlord Antonin Brzorad, who was later the mayor for many years. The patrician wealthy family of the Brzorads not only had many relatives in Nymburk, but also many friends people, to whom Němcová was naturally introduced. Among these, apart from Antonin’s brother, Filip Brzorad, the commander of the National Guard, there were also Antonin Brzorad’s nephews, Filip Černý and Jan Černý, known to us as a centurion of the Nymburk National Guard. So Němcová was an acquaintance not just of the Brzorads but also the Černýs family. The Brzorads were also related to the family of Všetečkas (Antonín’s grandfather's wife was Ludmila Všetečková), and the Černý family who were in a family relationship with the the Mašíns family (Jan Černý married Maria Mašínová). Kateřina, the sister of the two Černý brothers, married Jan Fleischman (No. 129), and so the circle of acquaintances spread to this family. This also explains why these well-known and affluent families belonged to Němcova's Nymburk's acquaintances.[82]

Němcová’s friends in Nymburk did not forget the interesting looks of Božena Němcová, and when poverty fell on her later on, they helped her with pleasure and willingness. The mediator was a maid Marie Votová, who, when the chips were down, wrote to Nymburk to the Brzorads, Mašins, etc., and never asked in vain. Thus much is known about the friends of Božena Němcová in Nymburk.[83]

         From Vondruška's work, we will also make use of the observation of the involvement of the Nymburk Brzoráds in revolutionary events:” It is interesting that the men at the head of the Nymburk’s National Guard[84] were men who also otherwise participated in public life. The commander was Filip Brzorad, the brother of the future mayor Antonín Brzorád and the son of the deceased (1848), mayor Vincenc Brzorád. The centurion was Jan Černý, Filip’s cousin, and František Všetečka was a Lieutenant. We meet the same men, leading burghers, in the security and information committee formed according to the Prague example to watch over the order in the community in these stormy times and to inform the public of everything they needed to know and what to do. In addition to the above we read the name of Dr. Jan Dlabač (1809-1873), the most intimate Němcová’s friend in Nymburk, Antonín Brzorád, Němcová’s landlord, František Mašín the brewmaster and others, all of whom Němcová would meet. At the time, Němcová came to Nymburk. There was, apparently, a lot of old lethargy and philistinism, but also a fairly enthusiastic fervor and pure national feeling.“[85]

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Bohumil Hrabal about Gustav Brzorád MD (1844-1914)

 

         The only son of Antonin Brzorád (1809-1877), MUDr. Gustav Brzorad (1844-1914) was a Nymburk physician - small, tiny, extremely active and hardworking, a great lover of nature. He lived in his birth house in Boleslavska Street No. 243, often bringing his family and friends together at his place. Note that we can find the hospital right in front of his house. He also owned a house on the square, at the corner of today's Kostelní Street. "This house, which was burned out in 1838, was apparently inherited from his inlaws. He had it demolished and built a contemporary house no. 40 and 41. in its place. - The house has preserved its original Neo-Renaissance appearance in the direction facing Kostelní Street until today. On this side at the level of the first floor we also find the statue of St. Theresa and under it there is an interesting inscription "IN PERPETUAM UXORIS USAE MEMORIAM ANNO DOMINI MDCCCLXXXVI." Meaning, to the eternal memory of his wife AD 1886. The name of Gustav Brzorad’s wife was Theresia. [86] Baptized as Terezie Anna (19th June 1853 - August 26, 1878), the daughter of Antonín Červinka, a citizen of the town of Nymburk from the neighboring house No. 42 and Anna née Dlabačová.

 

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St. Terezia’s statue on the corner house nr. 41 in Kostelní street.[87]

 

         In 1860 a permanent basis was laid for the amateur theater in Nymburk, when the students, who were on vacation there, led by the „Gymnasium“ pupil of the 6th year G. Brzorad grouped around L. Rubinger ... and set up an amateur theater. ... The play Divotvorný Klobouk by V. K. Klicpera  was very successful on September 3th and therefore the students played two more performances, Pašerové and Dr. Faust’s Domestic Cap. After these performances the theater was transferred from the boys' school to the U Černého Orla inn in the square, which stood in the place of today's MUDr. Antonín Brzorád‘s house. In the following text by Anna Jíchová, which was edited and adopted for his own by the writer Bohumil Hrabal[88], we read the story about the family of Gustav Brzorad MD from Nymburk:

         "Behind the Boleslav Gateat the corner of Velké Sady and Boleslavská Street - there is a large one-storey house ... with a nice balcony on the first floor. In front of the house is a neat garden with beautifully smartened up flower beds, surrounded by a fence, its rods are embedded in a low wall ... there are two barns screened by two mulberry trees and an old deep well ... Water is still weighed with a heavy steel bucket attached to a long chain, winding on a powerful shaft[89], ... Behind the house stretches a large, measuring a few korecs,[90]garden ... full of various fruit trees and bushes, gooseberries, currants and large beds of raspberries. Around the wall there are jasmine and lilac bushes ... today it is owned by Antonín Brzorád, doctor of medicine. His lady is beautiful and they have two daughters. His father was a small, tiny person ... He was a physician - a philanthropist ... in a tailcoat and an indivisible umbrella slung over his shoulder ... Everyone was „a little friend“ to him ... Once on a gloomy Sunday, our mother told us what she knew about the youth of the "doctor little friend". We could not believe that he had been young too ... Yes, he was young and certainly cheerful, my mother started ... His bride, with whom he was in love very much, was rich and of the most prominent family in the city ... He had put a lot of effort in making the bride’s parents like him. They then forced their daughter to renounce her love for a poor teacher and go to the altar with Dr. Brzorad ... Both lovers took this act of the bride’s parents with difficulty ... The young lady's beloved place was the little balcony in the front of the house. The grief was too deep for both of them ... the teacher was carrying his fate hard ... Along the fence of Brzorad's garden it smelled of lilac and jasmine, pansies and daffodils blossomed ... In the eyes of the young lady there was sadness and sorrowLilies of the valley and the lilac went out of bloom and in the warm summer nights the nightingale mournfully sang. … The fruits of strawberries smelled nicely ... The sadness did not leave the young lady ... Bad illness gnawed in her body and in the spirit of her sweetheart ... The windows of the little room, where the teacher stopped breathing were wide open ... death brushed with her wings the forehead of the sick man ... Then the young lady fainted heavily ... the sound of the death bell cut deep into her sensitive soul ... When the days of her life were filled, and Mrs. Brzoradova gave birth to her son, not even her husband's great love could keep his dear wife alive ...

 

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Boleslavská street Nr. 243, Brzorád’s house with the balcony[91]

 

         Sadness shuddered in our mother's voice ... After a short break, she told us: When you come to the cemetery, just opposite the chapel, by the first gate is a simple white memorial to Mrs. Brzorádová. There is a gilded inscription saying: Untimely, my beloved wife left me, she will be waiting for me at the gate of heaven, where our hearts will be forever united ... Underneath the verse a blank space is left,  to be filled in with golden letters when her husband will be lowered into the grave... Thedear little friend”, doctor has counted exactly the day when he leaves and when the sculptor picks up a chisel to put his name on a marble slab ... He did not forget anything, ourdear little friend”, doctor even determined the last path ... I do not know if the nightingale in Brzorad’s garden sings still sou mournfully ... (From the book „Život není žádná pohádka“ written by Anna Jíchová, Cleveland, O., December 30, 1951, which was adopted by Bohumil Hrabal as his own text.) [92]

         P.S. I was given this book one night at the U Zlatého Tygra inn by a young man with a note that his aunt from America sent him this book. And he is my reader and has just read the trilogy Městečko u vody (a Small Town by the Water), and „Život není žádná pohádka“ (the life is not a fairy tale) could be of interest to me because it is also about Nymburk. And when I read the book, I found that the way of seeing the town, where also the writer's time stopped, is the same as my poetic ... the author even stands above me in the sight of the detail... So first just in my thoughts and then in fact I copied the book in a shortened edition, made my textbook out of it, my abstract, my topography, by which I walk through the streets and visit the villages and places where the author's mother and herself went; And that is how I go around Nymburk and its region, like Marcel Proust, looking for and at the same time - in my thoughts - finding the lost time ... "[93]

         Gustav was a member of Union of the Czech Brethren - Sion, „established in 1891 with the aim of setting up a separate reformed church and building a respectable temple of the Lord.“ At the suggestion of Sion member MUDr. Gustav Brzorad the plot Na Spálence was selected for the construction of the church and it was purchased at a favorable price from the Northwest Railway on December 16, 1895. [94]

On the death notice we read that MUDr. Gustav Brzorád died on December 29, 1914 supported with holy sacraments as a „health consultant of k. u k. State Railways and a city doctor in Nymburk. Signed below is Gustav's son MUDr. Antonín Brzorád, k. u k. chief physician of the State Railways.[95]

 

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Antonín ‘GruntorádBrzorád MD (1876-1953)

 

Antonín Brzorád MD (1876-1953) was born on September 20, 1876 in Nymburk Nr. 243.

         The construction of the Nymburk hospital, across the street, was completed in 1881. On January 31, 1882, the hospital was consecrated and named "The District Hospital of Crown Prince Rudolf in Nymburk" and the operation of the hospital commenced on the following day. The hospital began with twenty beds, but it was extended to fifty the next year. Medical care was provided by two doctors: dr. Brzorád and dr. Baštecký; nursing care rested on the shoulders of the merciful sisters of the Order of St. Karel Boromeus. [96]

         On February 18, 1905 Dr. Antonín Brzorád  married Zdeňka (1885-1966), daughter of Josef Kabát, director of the sugar factory in Velvary. In 1907, they lived in Nymburk, No. 41-42. At that time their daughter Marie was born. Elsewhere, we read that they lived in a rebuilt native home house (Nr. 243), and that Antonin remained a friend and doctor of the family of Tomáš Černý, who we will talk about later. Today's contemporaries are reminded of several generations of the name of the homeowners who hosted Božena Němcov by the name of the park, which originated from the adjacent gardens and lands and which surrounds the house today, „Park Dr. Antonína Brzoráda“ (the park of Dr. Antonín Brzorád.) Her granddaughter remembers Zdeňka: "My grandmother was a charming, marvelous lady - she had a beautiful soul, I loved her very much. Her sister Milka, married Polák, and she was the mother of the famous professor of surgery, Emerich Polák, who was the head of the surgery department at the Vinohrady hospital in Prague; he was also a dean in the Medical Faculty in Vinohrady. Interestingly, he went to his uncle in Nymburk for holidays; the contact, and the rides with him influenced his decision to become a doctor. Grandma would often go to an orphanage, which she also supported financially." [97]

 

 

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Antonín Brzorád MD, a physician in Nymburk, a character in B. Hrabal’s novel and film Cutting it short, with his wife.[98]        

 

         In 1908 Antonin had house no. 252 built. (today the corner of the Palacký and Komenský Street). " The designer of the historic town house at the boundary of the historical center of the city, was the architect Osvald Polívka, who also designed the Nymburk Art Nouveau water tower and the summer villa of his father-in-law Dr. Tomáš Černý in Nymburk. In 1910, Antonin Brzorad, MD added a stucco relief of the arrival of Eliška Přemyslovna – later Elizabeth Queen of Bohemia (1292–1330) to Nymburk over the main façade made by the Prague sculptor Karel Novák. - It was the 600th anniversary of the famous event when Princess Eliška escaped on the night of 28. 5. 1310 from the intrigues of Henry of Carinthia from the Prague Castle and resorted to Nymburk, the town loyal to her father, Václav II. as well as to her. Here she spent the entire month in the former medieval house at the Black Eagle in the main square. - The partly cast and partly modeled relief depicts Elizabeth sitting on horseback in a simple dress with the company of the knights of the Lord of Vartemberk and the two maids accompanying her; at their feet is a bowing mayor. The scene is in a historically realistic concept with Art Nouveau elements. [99]

 

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Nymbur, house Nr. 252, corner of Palackého a Komenského streets[100]

 

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Stuco relief by Karel Novák, on house nr. 252, in 2017[101]

 

         Antonin was also a prominent chairman of the Nymburk sports club Polaban, for which he donated land for a football field. "... The years long dream of pharmacist Polák was fulfilled on August 18, 1909. At the constitutive meeting of the Nymburk sports club in the restaurant "U Matějků "(today's Dělnický dům) binding statutes were approved and the name Polaban was kept. It had 42 members at its establishment. ... In his absence MUDr. Antonin Brzorad, who was at that time an ulan at the military exercise in Vysoké Mýto was elected a chairman with 28 votes . Time showed it was a happy choice. The famous doctor has been at the head of the club for almost three decades. He assisted in its rebirth and at the end of his term he also experienced a period of considerable boom. ... At the January (1910) general meeting, the chairman dr. Brzorád highlighted the efforts of the committee, which had managed to form a team of players in the record-breaking time, and he also appreciated the introductory game results. He also did not forget to thank the city council for assistance in choosing a new pitch Also the journalists were thanked for the popularity of Nymburk football. He was pleased to note that more and more viewers came to the gallery. ... 1911 MUDr. Brzorád was re-elected the president of the club. ... 1920 In October, a significant event occurred in Polaban's history. The chairman of the club MUDr. Antonín Brzorad gave footballers the field for their football pitch his own plot behind the gassworks. The Football Union Committee, headed by Frantisek Joch, urged members and all supporters for the rapid transformation of soft tillage field into a solid pitch. ... 1928 Dr. Brzorad was named honorary chairman of the club. 1935 Before the kick-off of the first division match with Petrin Pilsen, a festive mood prevailed on Sunday, August 18, and excited speeches were given by  Mayor Fiala and MUDr. Brzorád. ... The merits of the long-time chairman of the club, MUDr. Brzorád were appreciated at his sixtieth birthday, when the playground behind the gasworks were named „Dr. Brzorád’s Stadium”. This ceremony took place during the club celebrations. ... 1939 At the July ceremonial meeting, the 30-year continuous work of the chairman MUDr. Antonín Brzorád was appreciated by presenting him a diploma and honorary union badge decorated with Czech garnets. ... 1940 Prague citizens were very warmly welcomed, Chairman of Polaban, MUDr. Brzorad recalled that it is an honor for the club in Nymburk, that a former home player Věchet plays for such a famous team. The guests responded with the compliment that they would soon be heading to Nymburk for league matches."[102]

         After the outbreak of the World War I in 1914, a prison camp and infirmary was set up in the military camp in Milovice. The leading physician there was MUDr. Antonin Brzorad from Nymburk and after him MUDr. František Tichý. 18,000-20,000 prisoners were guarded in the whole facility, but after large offenses there were up to 48,000. [103] 

         In the town of Nymburk an association of gardeners and fruit growers  was founded, which was chaired by Dr. Antonín Brzorád. The group had less than 20 members at that time, but mostly they were owners of family houses with their own gardens. He himself had dozens of fruit and ornamental trees on his estate, and for this purpose he had his own gardener, along with the families of the stableman and the driver of his personal car. The flats were along the current sidewalk in Poděbradská street from the family house. The whole garden had about 4 hectares of land, on one side to the estate of Mr. Janek and on the other side, today Smetana's Street as far as the Hussite Church. That was in 1915. [104]

          Dr. Antonín Brzorád was also the chairman of the board of directors of the brewery in Nymburk in 1934-1948, where František Hrabal ("Francin"), stepfather of Bohumil Hrabal, also worked since 1919, in the years 1930-48 as its administrator.[105] Little Bohumil became fully aware of the environment of the brewery in Nymburk and brought a number of real characters to his Cutting it Short – Postřižiny novel. The fact that Dr. Gruntorád - according to the book the admirer of Hrabal's mother Maryška - was actually MUDr. Antonin Brzorad, is confirmed by his granddaughter, Jana Bernáthová: "My Grandfather is indeed Gruntorád. Mr. Hrabal asked my mum for permission to mention him in the book and, after the agreement, he changed the name of Brzorád to Gruntorád." [106]

 

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Antonín Brzorád M.D., a physician in Nymburk and a character in B. Hrabal’s novel and film Postřižiny (Cutting it short). [107]         

 

His granddaughter remembers him as follows: "Antonim Brzorad (my grandfather) was a devoted physician, working night and day. I remember how the patients rang the bell at night at the door, the coachman Mr. Staškevič hitched a buggy with a horse and grandfather drove to a patient in the village. In winter he rode a sleigh - for me, amazing experiences, I had frequent rides with him. Every Sunday, he attended holy Mass. To the church of St. Giles he would ride in a closed carriage. He liked to go out to meet ordinary people at the Fidrmuc pub. He was a strict but kind grandfather. He would go hunting, two hunting dogs lived in his native house in Boleslavská Street. In the native house there was the so-called smart garden where even I admired the amazing flowers and trees. In addition to the beautiful garden, there was a large orchard that was looked after by Mr. Socha. I went to Nymburk regularly with my parents from Prague on Sunday for lunch, then for holidays." [108]

"In our last stop in the cemetery at St. George we mentioned the fate of some Nymburk families and their remains in connection with the removal of the cemetery. We have managed to find out that not all the remains "have disappeared irretrievably". ... the exhumed remains of Nymburk families - Červinka, Krajský, Černý, Huňků and Brzorád were also buried in the years 1967 - 9, including the remains of MUDr. Antonín Brzorád - grave No. 1618 - 1619 / IV."[109] Both Dr. Antonín Brzorád’s daughters Marie Pohorecká (1907-1984) and Jana Hanzalová (1917-1998) as well as his wife are buried in the tomb.[110]

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Kateřina Černá née Brzorádová (1771-1831)

In 1771, Kateřina Černá née Brzorádová (1771-1831) was born in Nymburk. It was she who married Tomáš (II.) Michal Černý from Nymburk, who belonged to the circle of Nymburk acqaintances of Božena Němcová.[111] Their son, Jan Černý (1808-1857) was a centurion of the National Guard in Nymburk in 1848 and remained in contact with his uncle, Josef Brzorád, whom he would tease in his letters by using Czech language. He married Marie Mašínová from Nymburk, who corresponded with F. L. Rieger[112] and their son JUDr. Tomáš (III.) Černý (1840-1909), lawyer and Prague Mayor. He is presented in Jan Otto’s Encyclopedia as an "excellent Czech lawyer, co-founder of the Prague Sokol, of Zemská banka (the country’s bank), 1882-85 Prague Mayor." It is his voluminous fonds deposited in the Archives of the National Museum, which contains the genealogy material preserved for the families of Filip Brzorad of Nymburk and his son, Josef Brzorad, of Lochkov. It is not only their correspondence and copies of the baptismal letters, but also a family tree, the ancestral chronicle, a notebook from which we will later quote, a book of period observations describing 19th century society and others. The fonds is currently being processed. [113]

 

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Josef Calasanz Brzorád (1777-1857), state councilor, owner of Lochkov estate

On the 2nd of October 1777 Josef Brzorád (1777-1857) was born as the youngest child in Nymburk, baptised as Josef Calasanz[114] by his uncle a Piarist priest Philip Sebald Wschetecžka, SchP[115], who otherwise taught at various Piarist Gymnasiums (High Schools) in Bohemia. This also explains the choice of his patron saint. Joseph Calasanz (1557-1648), a Spanish teacher and contemporary of John Amos Comenius, whom he  can be compared with as a reformer of education in the first half of the 17th century. He was a very pious and educated priest who, for the care of the school, established the order of the Piarists who are still active in our country. [116]

          It is not surprising that, like his brothers, Josef C. Brzorád completed his high school “gymnasium” studies at the Piarists in 1793 in Prague.[117] Thus he was there in 1792 when the Czech poet and linguist Josef Jungmann[118] studied there too. Then Josef C. Brzorád studied Philosophy (1794-6) and law (1797-1800) both in Prague, the same as his brothers Jan and Vojtěch did. He took the final examinations[119] (for" Aichbeamt ") and those for the civil service - now we would call themstate exams” - in Prague in 1801-2.

         As an articled clerk he worked at the Regierung / Gubernium, a provincial government in Krakow for a year. He was then a judicial candidate to the Prague magistrate until 1804. According to Schematism in 1805 he was registered in Týnská street in Prague with his brother Jan. In 1804-1806 he was a substitute councilor to the magistrate (“Magistratsrat”) in Kutná Hora[120] and also in Mladá Boleslav in 1806-9.[121] When his father bought the manor estate of Lochkov near Prague, he gave it to him. (Vilém writes elsewhere, "Because of illness, in 1808 Josef gave up the service and retired to Lochkov".) He kept it to his death. Here he performed the judiciary power until 1839 and he personally managed the farm, until 1853, when he yielded the position ofjusticiar“ to his son Vilém. In the same year he assigned his oldest son, Karel the tenant of the farm and passed the management of the farm to him.[122]

 

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 Josef Brzorád 1777-1857[123]

 

Correspondence 1807-1811

Else Fritschl studied part of correspondence between Joseph C. Brzorád, his father, father-in-law, his future wife, mother-in-law Delorme, and his brothers from the fonds Černý preserved in the Archives of the National Museum in Prague. Thus we learn some new details from the time of Lochkov's purchase and Josef Brzorad’s getting acquainted with Anna Delorme. The letters which Joseph wrote to his father were in Czech. The answers were often written by his brother-in-law, Tomáš Černý, in German, as well as letters from Joseph's brother Adalbert.

         Their German is slightly different from the language of Anna Delorme, who  probably,  for lack of formal use of the language,  apparently writes her lines, as they would come up in her mind. She does not use punctuation - neither comas and fullstops, nor even capital letters to divide sentences - and thus moves freely from a variety of practical themes to romantic ones and back. As for the neatness of writing, the letters from Ferdinand Delorme and his wife have the peculiarity that the letters in the words are not interconnected. Their daughter has already begun to link the letters. They all use German in their communication, Ferdinand occasionally employs a French expression.

         On February 16, 1807, Adalbert Brzorád wrote to his brother Joseph after the sale of the Nymburk mill - in response to his letter - that he was surprised - did not know that it would be so easy. He hopes that his father is now freed from worries and can enjoy the peace of his age. The price was good. "Maybe someone would say it's too expensive. But the buyer was satisfied." Some of the family did not behave well towards Joseph. He is surprised - he did not know that such a thing could happen in their family - that there would be greed, avarice. Their parents were so fair and they always tried not to favour anyone and not to privilege anyone. "Tell me honestly, who was so immodest and stupid to reveal his real character on such an occasion?" As for the money from the sale - what the father does is good because Josef gets his share first - the others (5 people "interesanten") in installments. "I'm happy." Josef is supposed to take care of Adalbert's share (to invest well).

         On the 9th of April 1807 Josef Brzorád writes to Tomáš Černý to Nymburk about the sale of the mill in Nymburk and the purchase of a new estate. There were more estates to be sold – He liked "Gut Loyowitz" but it was sold - a pity. But he thinks that such a thing, albeit bad, was sent to him by God. When his father goes to Prague, he should look at the estate – “Gut Tresning". "If he thinks it is worth it, I am already satisfied." He adds that at the table where he ate he heard about the auction of theStalskoestate. A Saxon-based private businessman bought it at an auction for 128,000 gold. However, between the bidders there was a reprehensible (sträflich) agreement – he paid them 1000 gulden each. "It's hard to say whether this auction is valid at all!"

         On the 23rd of December 1808 the beginning of the letter to Josef Brzorád from Mr. Lipkowenz is promising: "Hochedlegeboren Herr von Brzorád ..." But then we learn that Brzorád promised the seller Arioli (apparently in the course of the negotiations for the purchase of Lochkov) to deliver some pheasants. And so he received a letter from Mr Lipkowenz that the agreement was already valid and that he would have to send the pheasants, otherwise he would regret when they were bought elsewhere and the bill was presented to him for reimbursement.

         Then the first letters from Delorme from Portheim’s palace showed up. They are written alternately by Maria Anna Delorme née Schell (signed either as „Delormeor “Anna Delorme”) and Ferdinand. The first contacts between Joseph and the Delormes seem to occur regarding sending corn, salt, fruit, vegetables, etc. between Lochkov and Smichov.

         In 1809 (perhaps September) the first letter goes to Lochkov and in it Anna Delorme née Schell thanks him for the vegetables and fruits, and asks for eggs. The addressing was apparently only overheard  and therefore flawed: "Werther Herr von Persorád" (Honorable Mr. ...) Signed by “A. Delorme”.

         A month later they are invited to Lochkov to meet Josef’s father, Filip. Anna Delorme née Schell replies that it's not easy to meet on the weekday when Ferdinand Delorme is busy, but everything has to be done to meet his father (that is, Philip). If he can, he is should send his horses - they have a problem with theirs.

         January 16, 1810 Tomáš Černý writes from Nymburk to Josef Brzorad at Lochkov that Filip can not answer because he had to run somewhere else where they have a problem with water - the water was not clean.

 

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Probably Anna Brzorádová née Delorme, or her mother. [124]

 

         January 17, 1810 Anna Delorme née Schell wrote from Smichov to Lochkov to thank him for the gift and hoped that Joseph would visit them again, and that her daughter gave her thanks for the books that Josef B sent. She would read them with pleasure.

         On the other side of the letter Ferdinand Delorme wrote (he always begins - despite the contemporary social custom – his sentences in the correspondence - "Ich") and asked for Lochkov laborers to work in his garden. They would get 30 groshen per day. He would also use 2-3 “Mädgens” - girls for the factorythe girls would work in warmth and get 7-8 groshen. If there are such "Subjecte" in Lochkov, he would like them as soon as possible.

         In April 1810, Ferdinand wrote to Joseph about problems with one of the workers. First, he thanked them for the butter, he invites Josef to "Suppe" (soup) - if he has nothing better to do on Sunday. The Lochkov people who came to thrash the grain had apparently arrived. "Radomický" - the Lochkov laborer went to work for the Jew in Smichow instead. "When I learned this, I went to the police. The police officers deny that he would be there. Radomicý and the Jew have done something fishy (Unrat). He returned to our place to sleep in the stable (Stall). I handed him to the police the next day to be punished. ... I am expecting you on Sunday."

         In September 1810, Anna Delorme née Schell wants some grain - she has "Verlegenheit" - difficulty getting 19 (unknown kind of unit) of grain. She asked Joseph  to send it or buy it in Slivenec for her. Signed "Anna Delorme".

         In 1810 on St. Wenceslas day (28th September) Anna Delorme née Schell thanked him for the eggs and the hulled grain. He had offered her some young "Frischlinge" - this year's youngsters ( probably of a black-haired wildboar), but she wanted him to wait with them as she had no place for them. She was glad that he "Hofdecernamt" (department of the court office in Vienna) offered his brother the  office of a mayor because  thus he would be closer to Josef.

         In another letter, Ferdinand asked for help with milling, and he added humorously that Joseph can sees that if one is "complaisant" friendly, everybody exploits him ...

         November 27, 1810 from Smíchov to Lochkov: "I am delighted that you have offered to grind the grain. As soon as I get the promised salt, I will send it - if possible today. ... I understand what you want from your behavior, not from what you write. I guess you did not understand my daughter completely. If you have more contact, the relationship will form. From my experience I know that such “Mädgen” (Mädchengirls) never say YES for the first time. Nanny has no experience. Perhaps if you are persistent, you will not be treated as "Morast Veilchen" (violets in mud). The snag may be that you think you are courting a rich subject. Otherwise, according to good German manners, you should approach the father, who is not rich at all, though. And the daughter is not rich either. Nor is she going to get rich from her parents. And so your wish will  not be fulfilled because your wife has no money, which I can tell you straight away. Your devoted friend Delorme "

         They continue to visit each other.

         11th of December 1810 "Your friend Delorme" sends salt and sacks of flour to Lochkov, looking forward to the meeting -  forSuppe”.

         On the 22nd of December 1810, Anna Delorme, born Schell writes to Lochkov: "It is time you said "Wörtchen" - a word, because some say you are already dead." They thanked him for good nuts and a nutcracker. The daughter would thank him when she could see him, which she hopes would be the next day. "Come early because we eat at 4 o'clock. Keep in mind that you will not be able to leave during the holidays. Thanks for the sausages, rye, peas and lentils we've got."

         On the 23rd of December 1810 Ferdinand writes, "Best sit on a horse or carriage and come for a soup. I'll be home from 12, and we can talk long."

         According to other letters deposited in the Černý fonds of the National Museum Archive, Anna née Delorme, later Brzorad, borrowed books from the Lochkov library before the wedding. One of the authors of the books is Ewald, the names of some books are Bagatellen, or The Journey to Paris. The letters that Anna and Josef exchanged were delivered by a wench who would carry milk from Lochkov to Smíchov. One of the letters mentions preparations for a visit of Josef's father, Filip Brzorád from Nymburk. When Anna wanted to write a letter to her future father-in-law Filip Brzorad in Nymburk, she wrote a careful draft.

         Also Josef made a draft first. There is a particularly interesting one of his two versions of a very smooth-tongued letter in which he attempts to introduce himself to Therese Weisenberger, Anna Delorme’s older sister, then married to the rich trader Kašpar Weisenberger in Vienna. We do not know its exact dating, nor do we know which of the versions was eventually sent. However, her forthcoming response is dated in Vienna on 16 April 1811 and it arrived in Lochkov on 21 April 1811. It took 5 days. In the German concept we read the sentences in the sense:

         "Life is short for long compliments, so I put them away and introduce myself without their help. ... when I tell you how happy I am that I found my life mate. Now my wishes will be fulfilled ... It is the blessing of the generous Father of all that I may be related to you. So I wish that this bond was not just  for the civil law, but that it was true friendship and affection. I will try to do all that is in my power. But until I have the opportunity to prove that what I have said is a fact, I ask for Your favor. ... Your most humble servant...“

         What follows is the most interesting description about how to pronounce the name "Brzorád". Let us emphasize that - not only for the genealogists - this is a rather rare finding. From this more than 200-year-old text we can not only learn the facts and the form of written language. This time, the sound of a word that nobody could record for us at the time, can be heard:

         After I have introduced myself to You, I would like to ask you to recommend me to your husband as someone who seeks his friendship. I have heard that it is very difficult for him to pronounce my non-Czech[125] (nicht böhmischen) name. I have no choice, and to make it easier for him, I will mention this peculiarity of the Czech language, in which it is not unusual that consonants R and L are used instead of vowels, of which my name is an example. I therefore kindly ask your spouse to take the first two letters of my surname "Br" as one syllable - a bit - like the habit of a coach controlling a horse, while slowing down a wild steed.[126] And then he should let the next "Z" sound like the French Ç up to the next "O". I think the correct pronunciation of my name will no longer be a problem.”

         The original is: “Nachdem ich mich auf diese Art bei Ihnen eingeführt habe, bitte ich nun auch, mich bei Ihrem schätzbaren Gemahl auf das Beste zu empfehlen und als einen Mann vorzustellen, dem daran gelegen ist, sich seine Freundschaft zu erwerben. Da ich vernommen ,daß es ihm schwerfallen soll, meinen nicht böhmischen Namen auszusprechen, so kann ich nicht umhin, zu seiner Erleichterung die Eigenheit der böhmischen Sprache hier berühren, in welcher es nicht ungewöhn lich ist, daß der Mitlaute r und 1 die Stelle der Selbstlaute vertreten wovon sogleich mein Zuname ein Beispiel abgeben kann. Ich bitte daher den Herrn Gemahl , die ersten zwei Buchstaben meines Zunamens Br als eine Silbe auszusprechen versuchen zu wollen - ungefähr - wie die Pferdebändiger in Gewohnheit haben ,um ihre mutigen Rösser in Ruhe zuerhalten und dann das darauffolgende z wie das französische Ç  zu dem o klingen zu lassen. Ich bin verführet, daß es ihm nicht halb so viel Mühe verursachen wird, diesen Namen ganz korrekt zu lesen.”[127]

 

On the 11th of June 1811 "Josef Brzorád, the owner of the Lochkov estate", at the age of 34 married the sixteen-year-old Anne Delorme, a Catholic in the Smíchov church. The witnesses were his brother Jan Brzorád J.D. and brother-in-law Kaspar Weissenberger, businessman. From the voluminous correspondence of the engaged couple, we exempt the letter of the 8th June 1811 from Lochkov as an example. In the seals of Joseph's letters "JB" stands in as his coat of arms on the background of various agricultural tools. In part of the book called Familie Delorme, you can find a letter from the fiancée "Nanny" of the same date as well as her picture. „Brzorád” - as he signed - uses the addressing "Liebste Nina".

 

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Dopis Josef Brzorád’s letter to Anna Delorme of 8th June 1811[128]

 

On March 28, 1812, a daughter Philipine Brzorad was born in Smíchov in house nr. 80, baptised at St. Philip and Jacob. The Godparents were Anna with Ferdinand Delorme and Caspar with Teresia Weisenberger. After the death of Philipine’s mother, it was she who cared for her siblings and later as a spinster for their children.

 

In 1813 Karel Brzorád (1813-1871) was born in nr. 80 in Smíchov and baptised as Carl, Ferdinand, Johann, Caspar. The Godparents were “Ferdinand Delorme, Kaufmann”, „Johann Brzorád, J.u.D“ and „Caspar Wewissenberger, Kaufmann.“ Karl was the successor of the family in Lochkov and his family was very numerous.

        

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Lochkov’s castle from the back, photo by JS in 2002

 

In 1814, Josef Brzorád became the owner of the Lochkov allodial estate, and in Schematismus he is also referred to as "Justiziär".[129] The Justiziär was a lawyer qualified in political sciences, who himself was in charge of dealing with heavier lawsuits. For this position, the directors of estates would chose a Prague lawyer or shared a lawyer with another lord.[130] As for the farm, we already know that Joseph's father bought a coal mine and two meadows in Smíchov due to lack of wood and land.[131] We find them in a cadastre maps dating back to 1840 on what is now an island called Císřská Louka on the Vltava River directly against Vyšehrad. In the 19th century, then the house No. 1 in the yard was rebuilt into a modest mansion. The building of a rectangular ground plan with a turret, a balcony in the front and a short wing had its own chapel. In the 1840s Lochkov had 49 houses with 485 inhabitants[132] and a farm of 277ha. [133] More about the Lochkov vineyard, the harvest or the garden can be found in the memories of Anna Brzoradová, which we keep as a whole in a separate section.

 

In 1814, Vilém Brzorád was born (1814-1898). Later, he was a provincial lawyer and administered Jinonice estate where he also died and was buried. More about him in a separate section further below.

 

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 Lochkov – A blurred acquarelle by A. Erben cca 1850 copied in pencil by E. Fritschl

 

Meteorologische Beobachtungen

 

In 1816 Josef Brzorád begins to record meteorological observations, which he performed with great care at Lochkov for 40 years until 1856. In the year 1868, his son Vilém, then an attorney in Litomyšl handed these files, entitled „Guth Lochkow Meteorologische Beobachtungen vom/Im Jahr 1825 von J. C. Brzorád“, for the collection of Prague university Library into the hands of a family friend, k. k. librarian PhDr. Ignatius Hanuš.[134] In three well arranged tables there is a figure in columns with headings saying Baromether, Thermomether, Wind, (+ 1 unreadable) for each day of the month. Later Hygromether  was added. His son, Vilém, enclosed a text “Správa” to the file, in which he introduces the personality of Josef Calasanz Brzorád to the librarian and writes about his relationship to sciences:

         "His love to his homeland was warm, also to freedom, to knowledge, and especially to the findings of the arts and crafts. He was interested in the phenomena linked to astronomy as well as winds, to the extent that as a student he fostered an interest in bird catching.  He recorded not only the number of caught birds, but using his own signs he recorded the weather at the moment of catching. From 1797, he also used signs for making notes of the winds up until 1811, when he got married. Then he had to overcome the difficulties connected with starting a household and farm facilities - he certainly had a lot to do for the past frequent changes of the owners of the neglected estate, and also for the repayment of the assumed debt. Then with a well-ordered household and necessary quiet in 1816 he began to write down three times a day in the course of 41 years of windy events with a caution so steady that if there was any obstacle – a trip etc. - to do it personally - he would instruct somebody to write down the recordings in question, which he would then copy in his own hand.

 

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 Lochkov - Skizzenbuch Anton Erben (archiv Else Fritschl)

 

Apparently he was also interested in astronomy and he was thinking about what he was doing with such zeal. That can be documented by the fact that he could set up set up a pressure meter, a thermometer and even the sundial, which he had set up many times. He would use the former during his trips to the mountains to measure their heights. I attach two sheets filled with his notes about astronomy and meteorology etc. ... "[135]

 

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 Im Garten von Lochkov 16.5.1857 Skizzenbuch Anton Erbens (archiv Else Fritschl)

 

 

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Guth Lochkow Meteorologische Beobachtungen vom/Im Jahr 1825 von J. C. Brzorad

 

On 6 March 1816 Luise / Ludovica Maria Theresia Brzorad was born in Lochkov, whose tombstone is still found in the wall of Slivenec Church. She died on 29 April 1817. The godparents were: "Ludowika Delorme, Hofmeisterin bei der Königin von Denmark, Ferdinand Delorme, Fabrikant von Smichow, Anna + Joseph ?” and “Theresia Weisenberger gebohren Delorme".

        

On 7th of May 1816 a widower Ferdinand Delorme, 60 years of  age (religion given wasreformiert”) married 26 year old Theresia, daughter of “Franz Pichel Stadtrathfrom Prague.

        

On 27th July 1818, Marie Anna Theresia Brzoradova (1818-1888) was born in Lochkov nr. 1, who later married k.u.k. engineer Karel Hauptmann. In the baptism register we read that her Grandmother Marie Anna Delorme née Schell was born in Prague nr. 151 and the godparents were Ferdinand Delorme and  Theresia Delorme, Fabrikantin vom Smichov”.

        

On 31st January 1820, Eduard Brzorad (1820-1898) was born in Lochkov, a future lawyer and notary in Deutschbrod, who married Marie Edle von Krziwanek (1834-1898), and thus joined the Brzoráds to the von Herites family. We dedicate a whole chapter to him later on. The godparents were Ferdinand Delome, Theresia Delorme and Theresie Weissenberger geb. Delorme.

        

On 26th September 1821 Ferdinand Ludovicus Brzorad (1821-1863) was born on Lochkov No. 1. He remained single and was an “adjutant” (assistent court official) of the provincial court. The godfathers wereFerdinad Delorme, Kaufman zu Prag, Theresia Delorme, Kauferin, and Ludwik Nidaj / Nicolai, Studiosus.”[136]

        

On 16th April 1823, Josef Cal. Rudolf Ferd. Brzorád (1823-1890), the last son was born in Lochkov. Later he became a very wealthy owner of a farm and a coal mine in Hungary. His godparents were Ferdinand Delorme, Kaufman, Theresia Delorme, Kauferin” and sister "Philipine Brzorad, Gutsbesitzers Tochter".[137]

        

The magazine of the patriotic museum society “Časopis společnosti vlastenského musea” from 1827 - first year runninglists “Mr. Josef Brzorád the Lord at Lochkov” in the list of its subscribers.[138]

        

On June 14, 1828, Ludovica Josepha Ludomila Philippina was born in Lochkov No. 1 to Josef and Anna Brzorad. Sadly she died shortly on March the 5th, 1829.

 

On 12th December 1833, the last child, Anna Maria Philippina, Theresia Brzoradová (1833-1865), was born in Lochkov. Later she married the school inspector Anton Erben (1835-1905). Her godparents were siblings Karl, Philipina, Maria and Vilém, “Jurist im erst. Jahr”.[139]

The report about the Czech museum “Zpráva o českém muzeu” from 1837 mentions on page 231 that Mr. Brzorád, the Lord at Lochkov sent some kind of a lambpotwotneho beranka” for the animal collections. [140]

 

The Danish princess visiting Lochkov

In June 1838, the Brzoráds / Delormes were visited at Lochkov by a princess and after 1839 Queen Karolina Amalia von Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg (1776-1881), a charge but also a friend of Louise Delolme. Augusta Brzoradova (1851-1940) remembers this visit in 1935 newspaper article: "Between Chuchle and Radotin the steep bank of the Vltava River is broken by a side valley. One edge forms the round peak of a mountain, behind which lies the village and estate of Lochkov. This hill is called Karolinen Berg.[141] Why it is called so is known in Kopenhagen rather than in Prague. ... How hearty was the friendly relationship between the princess, the later Danish queen Amalia and her court lady and friend Louise Delorme we can see from the fact she visited the Delormes home in Braunschweig and Lochkov. (It is no surprise that Amalia wanted to meet Louise’s Cousin, Anna Brzorad née Delormewith whom Louise had been in such intense correspondence contact.) That was in July 1838. She was wondering how the hill from which she was enjoying the beautiful view of the Vltava River valley was called. She was told it has no name.  So the name could be Karolinenberg - Karoline's Mountain, the princess decided. The princess could afford something like this. Especially such a good princess. On the occasion of her visit the first children's care institution was founded following the example of Koppenhagen. It must have been a wonderful fate that next to the princess there was standing the grandmother of Augusta Brzoradova (1881-1916), who cared for the very "Kindergarten" in Vinohrady her entire life.“ [142](The article is displayed in full in the section on Karl Brzorád further below)

 

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The Danish Queen Karoline Amalie von Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Augustenburg (1776-1881)[143]

 

Stammbuch für Anna Brzorád

15th of June 1841 "Joseph Brzorad Vater" wrote into his eight-year-old daughter Anna’s scrapbook[144]: „Liebe Gott über Alles und den Nächsten wie Dich Selbst. Dann wirst Du beten und arbeiten, der Tugend folgen, und das Laster fliehen und so Dein Glück hier und Jenseits begründen.“ - Love God above all and your neighbor as yourself. Then you will pray and work, follow virtue, escape unrighteousness, and so your happiness here and forever establish.

Mother "Anna Brzorad geb. Delorme" wrote about five days later: „Blühe auf wie das Veilchen im Moose, verborgen, doch edel und rein, und lass der üppigen Rose den Stolz bewundert zu sein.“ - Bloom like violets in moss, hidden, yet noble and pure. And leave the pride of admiration to the lush rose.

 

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Stammbuch für Anna Brzorád (later Erben), Else Fritchl’s archive

 

         All the siblings and their wives gradually contributed to the scrapbook. Merry Sister Anna was the darling of all.

On June 15, 1841, the brother "Vilím Brzorád" wrote copied 101st sonet from The Daughter of Sláva by Kollár[145] and added the folk wisdom: "Short speech and a nice word, will make people do a lot; and if you remember this, you will live happily." Vilím’s wife Antoinette, added to the enclosed  flower: "Je vous donne ces pensespour que vous a moi pensez There also „alte Tante Therese Weißenbergerjoined.

Brother Eduard wrote to his sister on September 30, 1841: „Ringe nicht nach eiteln Kränzen, zu oft sind sie des Zufalls Spiel; Nein, still zu schaffen, nicht zu glänzen sey Deines Lebens schönstes Ziel.“ 

27. 2. 1842 Sister Philippine wrote: "„So sanft, so geduldig, so folgsam wie dieß Lämmchen, möchtest Du werden, meine liebe Schwester! gewiß die Liebe Gottes und allen guten Menschen wäre dann Dein reicher Lohn. Dieß der Wunsch Deiner Dich innig liebenden Schwester.“

Also the old Uncle Caspar Weißenberger showed his humour, when he wrote on 14. 4. 1843: „Darf ich Liebe Nanny darüber keinen Vorwurf machen, daß du dich nicht darauf erinnerst schon im Jahr 833 bei mir in Mogyoros gewesen zu sein, so behalte dagegen in deinem freundlichen Andenken, daß ich 10 Jahre späther bey dir in Lochkov war, …“ It was in 1833 that Anna was born.

 

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Anna Erben née Brzorád, Daguerreotype par Monsieur Le Pescheur 24. 5. 1849[146]

 

 

The painter Thorald Læssøe at Lochkov.

In 1842, Lochkov was visited by the Danish painter Thorald Læssøe (1816-1878). He was the son of Margarete Juliane Signe née Abrahamson, a prominent and literally active hostess of art circles in Copenhagen. She was known to Louise Delolme. Thorald Laessoe studied at Kunstakademie in Kopenhagen and painted landscapes and architecture. He was driven to Prague for his studies and he visited Lochkov because of his acquaintance with Louise Delolme. He received a friendly reception here, which brought him closer to Louise, even more than his illness or his sensitive, melancholy creature. He also painted a view of Lochkov  for Louise Delolme on a folder, which he had made himself, for Louise to hang it over the writing desk. [147]

 

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Thorald Laessoe (1816-1878): Lochkov 1842, oilpainting, 28x20cm.  (Dr. Robert Mayr’s private archiv,) [148]

 

In 1844 Thorald Læssøe drove to Italy via Austria. So he stopped again at Lochkov and brought greetings and presents from Louise Delolme, as the most precious one - the picture of the Danish royal couple. When he returned to Copenhagen from Italy after five years, he renewed his relationship with his old friend. [149]

 

The next entry in Anna’s scrapbook is from 13th of April 1844 and it is from Louise Delolme written in Copenhagen:

 

Zu schnell entflieht der Schönheit Glanz, verwandelt sich in Nacht,

flicht Geistesanmuth nicht den Kranz, der dann auch lieblich macht,

wenn Lilien und Rosen fliehn, und Falten Wang und Stirn umziehn.

Elise von der Seile

Daß wahre, im christlichen Glauben wurzelnde, und also auch mit Herzens Demuth gepaarte Geistesanmuth, so wie jegliche weibliche Tugend Dein Theil werden möge, ist meine theure Anna, der herzliche Wunsch Deiner Dich innig liebenden Louisi Delolme.“

 

In 1845-8 Joseph's son Wilhelm Brzorad was the administrator and legal official "Verwalter und Justiziaer" in Lochkov.[150]

 

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Anna Brzorádová born Delorme 1795-1846 (archive of J. Brzorád)

 

In 1846, Anna Brzoradova born Delorme died at her fifty years of age. Her granddaughter, Selma Mayr preserved her Aunt Philippine’s memory: "When the grandmother died, the Jews from the village asked (die Juden aus dem Dorfe sich die Gunst erbeten) to carry the coffin from the castle to Slivenec where the family grave was. Naturally, I imagined it very festive: the old, long-bearded Jews, as were Abraham and Isaak in the Bible."[151] The 21-year-old daughter of Philippine took over the position of the housewife.

 

The list of members of the patronage of the Economic Society in Prague in the 1840s contains an unfilled statement, on the reverse of which is handwritten "Joseph Brzorad, Gutsbesitzer in Lochkov". Joseph, however, is nowhere listed as a member, unlike his son Charles.[152]

 

The period 1846-1857 is also covered by the memories of the granddaughter - Anna Brzoradová, which are translated in a separate section.

        

In 1850, Professor MUDr. Jan Helcelet (1812-1876) writes to his friend, the philosopher Jan Ignác Hanuš (1812-1869) - both national revivalist, participants of revolutionary year 1848 and friends of Božena Němcová - P.S.1 "Write when you will go to the Brzoráds and when you will return". The editor's note to the text says that "these are the sons of Josef Brzorad, the owner of the Lochkov estate near Radotín, Wilhelm and Karl, with whom Hanuš was friends."[153] Let us be reminded that the events of 1848 were actively attended by Josef's brother, the Prague attorney JUDr. Jan Brzorád, a member of the National Committee, and also that in 1848-1850 Božena Němcová lived in Josef's nephew Antonín Brzorád’s Nymburk house.

        

The belles-lettres magazine Lumír published in Prague in 1851 published an "extract from the Fourth Statement of Voluntary Contributions to Building the Czech National Theater", which on page 813 states: "... - Mr. Josef Brzorad, owner of Lochkov Farm, 100 zl."

 

In 1853, Josef Brzorád gave the position the Lochkov estate legal official over to the son JUDr. Vilém Brzorád and the farm administration to his son Charles as a tenant (he rented it). [154]

 

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Josef Brzorád  (1777-1857) , foto Langhans, archiv J. Brzorád

 

On 20th of June 1857 Josef Brzorad dies. His granddaughter Anna remembers the sick, coughing grandfather they were not allowed to kiss any more. "He had an eye cancer, poor thing. When the dead man lay on his bed, we had to kneel and pray and kiss his hand. He was displayed in a large hall, where only a wallpaper door was opened, laid in a chapel that was in the annex of the castle, and where there was room only for the altar, priests, servers, and the great "Todte-Denkbilder," with candles thick as the arms which were burning in the day, and where the mass was read for the dead. Anna Delorme and two little aunts Luises, who were buried in Slivenec."[155]

On the monument, which was built in the Slivenec cemetery, we can read the inscription "Hier ruhen im Frieden unsere theuern Eltern Anna Brzorad geb. Delorme geb. Day 9. June 1795 gestures. Day 12. April 1876 Josef Calasanz Brzorad geb. 2. Oktober 1777 gestures. Day 20. June 1857 Herren des Gutes Lochkov. " The monument uses the full name of the patron saint, Saint Joseph Calasanz - Joseph Calasanz (1557-1648). Although in around year 2000 the tombstones were dismantled, as the last monument in the graveyard, it was later repaired by the parish, the plates with inscriptions placed back into the main tombstone with God's eye and an aspersorium and it was erected in the cemetary near the wall. (Situation in 2017.)

 

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The plates with the tombstone inscriptions in 2008. Photo JS

 

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The main tombstone and the basement of the Brzorads grave in Slivenec cemetary in 2008. Photo JS

 

His son William (1814-1898) remembers his father as follows: "He was a good and grateful son, a kind brother, husband and father. From his youth, diligent in the sciences, especially in favor of the natural sciences, he kept a diary (whose six books I own), made notes of meteorological observations (which I handed over to the University Library in Prague), he wrote to his father in Czech language, kept every letter his father and brother Vojtěch (before his departure from Bohemia) left in Nymburk. I have more than one hundred of them in Jinonice near Prague. He was a philanthropist - "Menschenfreund", but economical as the owner of the estate, yet the real father of the poor, the helper in need, so the priest Brož at his funeral remarked that there was no one in the neighborhood who would not love him or not honour him. - He was a good educator in terms of psychological and physical education, pious, but with Hussite tolerance and the desire for freedom "von hussitischer Toleranz und Freiheitsliebe" (?), uncompromising where he was convinced of his truth. - As a book lover he left a spectacular library, so each of his eight children got a lot of them, he also left a collection of minerals.[156]

         Elsewhere[157] Vilem wrote about his father: "His behavior was silent, taciturn, and strict and he was a philanthropist to the extent that - although as an administrator and legal official he was forced from time to time to reprimand those  subordinate to him, yes, even to punish some of them there was no one  who would not love him sincerely, or trust him as a benign father. ... He raised and provided for 8 children: 5 sons and 3 daughters so that it was only up to them to take a position in or outside the country completely adequate to their status.

 

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Vilém Brzorád (1814-1888), archiv J. Brzorád

 

As a curiosity of the time I allow myself to add: his parents were pure Czechs, and their sons especially wroteespecially to their grandfather - only in Czech. School education, but also the manners usual in the country where he lived, caused that he got used to use German language in family and when dealing with friends in both speaking and writing. Our father never lost warm love for his country and his mother tongue and was a personal admirer of nationalists, and a close friend in the family of Martin Pelcl (one of his granddaughters is my wife). When his sister’s son Jan Černý (father of Tomáš Černý JD) knowing his love for the mother tongue wrote him in Czech – my father considered this to be daring, to address an older relative in a different language to the one he is used to. Even his children were raised exclusively in Czech and I remember that I was somewhat tormented in the family for my imperfect knowledge of Czech language. After all, he liked to buy Czech books and he would have become a co-founder of the Matice Česká publishing house[158], if he had not sign me as such, which was following the unforgettable Josef Jungmann's advice so that the benefit from the investment could be used for the longer time in the family.

         His thoughtfulness was excellent, which is why the documents and letters the first dated from 1773 have been preserved by the family.  He kept a journal about all the things that happened to him.  From this and from the letters could be created interesting pictures, no less than those recently published from the journal by Dr. Held announced by Bohemia."[159]

         Josef Brzorad's extensive correspondence with his father is preserved and kept today by the National Museum Archive. The diary is not there, though.

 

 

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The Lochkov glass paperweight standing on the preserved desk of Anton Erben in Graz. Pictures date back to 1850. (Photo JS)

 

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The Lochkov watercolor picture standing on the preserved desk of Anton Erben in Graz. Pictures date back to 1850. (Photo JS)

 

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The Lochkov watercolor picture standing on the preserved desk of Anton Erben in Graz. Pictures date back to 1850 – close up without flash. (Photo JS)

 

 

 

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From the diary of Tomáš Černý JD (1840-1909), a lawyer in Prague and the nephew of Josef Brzorád.

 

Farewell to Josef Brzorad at Lochkov. On Tuesday, June 23, 1857. „In my Father's house are many mansions; I go to prepare a place for you.“[160]

         I was painfully touched by the news I received of a death notice on Sunday . My dear Lochkov Uncle, Josef Brzorad, passed away on Saturday at seven o'clock in the morning. His miserable state, when I saw him last, foretold the fact that he would die shortly. I was surprised, however, by the sudden news. How I wish I'd seen him one more time before he died. It was  my immediate intention to go to the funeral, and I was encouraged by Uncle Plaček in that. I was anticipating yesterday and today who would arrive from Nymburk. Yesterday evening auntie Adleta[161] with Miss Brzoradova, with Jeníček Dlabačovský.[162]

This morning we set out together at 7 o'clock in a fiakr[163]. The day was beautiful, sweltering, a lot of dust. The journey was passing quickly; we arrived via Slivenec to Lochkov at about 9 am. The funeral was to take place at 10 am. Both our aunties came down to meet us, both in sadness. Anna first. She had a beautiful face today; the silent struggle fought on her pale-faced cheeks with brave sufferings: sad was the look, my heart was fluttering. We went upstairs. Uncles William and Karel received us, both filled with pain, but of stable minds. Also two from Chlum were there with the aunts. The other brothers also came slowly. Eduard, Rudolf, Ferdinand; the priests came too.

With Uncle William, we went upstairs to the room where the uncle was lying. Candles were burning around the coffin. The wind blew through the open windows. We uncovered the lid. The body lay, his hands on the cross, clad in a black shroud, his head tilted backwards, one eye blindfolded, the other one rolled back, his mouth open. The smell of the body was weak although it was the fourth day. The poor thing lay dead surrounded by the grieving family; And yet I did not feel even a little sorrow, only a serious mourning. Never, never before I had ever felt so clearly the immortality of the human soul. Here the body lay before me: could the soul also die? - Impossible.

Recently my uncle reportedly suffered very much with his eye; but it was somewhat better at the end; the doctor thought he would last until the autumn. On Saturday morning, when he woke up from sleep he was asking for milk. Then when he coughed, Charles asked him if he wanted tea. Give me, that was the answer. Charles went to tell Philippina; Anna came to ask her father if he wants milk. Give me, he said. He took a glass to his mouth and having started to drink, his head suddenly droppedthe thread of life was broken.  

At about 10 am the priests went up and prayed at the coffin. The room was full of people, so Jeníček and I barely got some room in the room. After that, the coffin was taken down and the procession beganit was a sad look! The sons with tears in their eyes carried the coffin with their father, after them the landowners from the neighborhood, retired people, workers paid in kind; then again the sons carried the coffin into the Slivenec Church. The priest ascended to the ambo and held the burial speech. It was miserable, but it could not but proclaim the praise of the deceased.

Born in Nymburk in 1777 on October 12th, he was due to come to his eightieth year. Having studied law he joined the civil service in Mladá Boleslav, Kutná Hora, Krakow. For his illness he gave that up and represented his father in the Lochkov farm; After a year it passed into his hands in 1808. Here for half a century he spent his godly life, dedicated to the sciences and to the welfare of his subjects; the special object of his care was the school and the poor. Surrounded by an exemplary family he lived to see high age, he deceased in the Lord.

That is the core of the speech. After the requiem mass, the coffin was buried at the door of the church, next to the wife of the immortalized. There were so many people in the small cemetery that I could not come to the grave. - The sons lowered their father into the grave themselves, they threw the first shovels of the earth on his body, after the sons the daughter, then the granddaughters, then we were the last to pay homage to our beloved patriarch. Everyone wept, everyone was drowned in tears, both the family and the people, "and will God give him an everlasting joy?" said an old man next to me, the words which tore sobs out of my breasts. After the funeral, one more Mass was read., then we sat in the carriages and went to Lochkov.   

We had lunch at our uncle Karel’s; 25 sitting at the table; and none of  uncles’s children among the people. I talked to Jeníček, because there was no one else to talk to. Little did they paid attention to us; who would ask otherwise; Hauptmann sat in the second room with a teacher /who seems a bit vulgar to me/ with the cousins. Only Emma walked past several times, today I respected her even more seeing her honest pain at the funeral, and tears in her eyes.

When we got up from the table about half past three, I asked Lotti for her mother in German, and because she did not let go of her ironic smile, I used it with all the coldness as well. Having entered the room we missed Jenicek Černý.[164] We went out to look for him and I gladly used the opportunity to look around Lochkov for the last time. Because, I'm not going to come here so soon anymore, it is almost certain. With my uncle gone who liked to see me here, and the aunts would not stay here anyway. Uncle Charles's family is already distant to us. I went with Jeníček along the slope of that wooded boulder bending into the pretty valley, we went along the vineyard, and last time I sent my eyes on the nightingale’s grove. The sun was drawing toward the distant hills, and the calm landscape commanded a wonderful view. Aunt Aletta and Miss Brzoradova left us in the meantime.

We were awaited by Karl's carriage, also carrying the aunts from Chlum. We said good bye to all the Lochkov good souls in the garden, and having alighted we were speeding to Prague. The councilor Jakub made the fast horses hurry up. Filip’s Aunt was talkative more than usual, and so we had a good time on our way, especially when the sudden rain made us even more cheerful ... Sad I set out, slightly cheerful I returned ...[165]

 

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The death notice of Josef Brzorád[166]

 

 

Josef Brzorád and his wife Anna’s children who lived to the adult age were: Philipine (1812-1886), Karel (1813-1871), Vilém (1814-1898), Marie (1818-1888), Ferdinand (1821-1863), Rudolf (1823-1890) and Anna (1833-1865).

 

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Philippine Brzorádová (1812-1886)

Philippine Brzorád was born on 28. 3. 1812 in Smíchov Nr. 80, and baptised at St. Philip and Jakob as Philipine Anna Theresia. The Godparents were Anna with Ferdinand Delorme and Caspar with Theresia Weisenberger.

A festive poem recited in the name of the schoolchildren in Lochkov was preserved in neat handwriting.  The teacher, who probably wrote the lyrics apparently anticipated the knighting of the Brzoráds.

“Poem on the day of the First of May, on the name’s day, for the Noble and High-minded Damsel Filipine, Lady of Brzoráds. Humbly recited in the Name of Lochkov’s School Youth.[167]

 

1.Welcome the glorious day of May

the spring window into the world,

in which the groves blossom

and all the flowers bloom.

The trees are turning green,

The birds sing sweet

The mountains and hills rejoice

All creation becomes refreshed.

 

2. And also we rejoice,

Thanking God,

That he let us live to see the day,

singing him praise,

for all the gifts and grace

let the name given us from heaven

be extolled thousandfold.

 

3. The cause of joy

on the feast of Philip the Saint

which she celebrates devoutedly

and after whom she has her name

At the baptism endowed

is the gorgeous little flower,

no fail in virtues and manners

the noble lady little Filipine.

 

 

4. With whom as with the first gift

the most noble parents

were from the grace Divine

pleased the most.

With them also we rejoice,

with our manorial lords,

towards us most benign,

gracious at all times.

 

5. Hence with all deference

Both the small and big

we wish in meekness

good health ever lasting

happy living

good luck and delight

for the noble Filipine

we request without end.

 

6. Lord, through the gift of all graces

confirm our judgement

so that our manorial lords

get awarded threefold.

That they always rejoice

With their kind darlings

Here in this world and in eternity

that they reunite in heaven happily.”

 

Filipine remained an unmarried spinster. After the death of her mother in 1846 Filipine had to fill in in the place of the Mother; to take care of the house, farm and siblings.[168] At that time Philipine was 34, Karl 33 and had already married Emma Tschapek, Wilhelm 32 had married Antonie Svěcený, Marie 28 had married engineer Hauptmann, Eduard 26 did not marry until 1852, Ferdinand 24 remained single, Rudolf 23 had already been in Hungary but Anna was only 13.

After the sale of Lochkov in 1862 Filipine lost her home and lived at her married sisters’s, Anna and then Marie. After Anna died in 1865 Filipine took care of her children: Antonie was 4 years old, Anselma 2 and Wilhelm 1. The Aunt’s  help was welcomed in all households full of children. „Tante Filipi“ is often mentioned in the memories by her niece Anna Brzorád, which are given further below in one piece in a separate section.[169] Also Selma Mayr, who was brought up by her, wrote about her: ‚In my memories she is of a small, puny figure with brown hair and large blue eyes, a laced black little bonnet, crinoline, graceful – on the sides laced up shoes. When she and my father[170] went to the theatre, or to the concert she wore a nice silk blouse, a velvet ribbon with a jewel made of genuine pearls on her forehead and a cashmere scarf folded into three corners with long fringing on its edges, which I liked particularly.

 

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Filipine Brzorád (1812-1886) in 1862, archiv J. Brzorád

 

When it got dark, we begged: “Bitte, Tante , erzähle von Lochkov und wie Du klein warst” – Please, Aunt, tell about Lochkov and when you were small. Here a lot out of these stories remain in my memories coloured vividly by the childish fantasy. As the Queen of Denmark visited Lochkov, as the horse in front of the carriage shied and bolted and Aunt fell out of the carriage and fell with her head on the rock – the white horse with its mane fluttering, Grandma[171] was holding fast, the Aunt flying at a high speed into the ditch, the coachman fell off and was running after the carriage to pick up the reins, which were being dragged on the ground, the people working on the fields running to help; it was all so gripping as a fairy tale, an so I recollect all so vividly and colorfully.’ [172]

 

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Filipine Brzorádov (1812-1886), archiv J. Brzorád

 

 Tante Philipi“ died in Prague on 4th of November 1886 after a few weeks of an illness of pneumonia. Her niece Selma Mayer, „She looked after and worked for others for her whole life. Humble, quiet, content with a little. Of a tireless diligence, fervid faith in God, religious values, kind and rare character.“ [173] Philipine was an important person and for her role of a housewife, which she coped with after the death of her mother, she belonged to the histories of many relatives.

 

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Karl Brzorád (1813-1871), the owner of the Lochkov estate

 

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Karl Brzorád (1813-1871), archive of Jiří Brzorád

 

Karl Brzorád was born in Smíchov in house nr. 80 in 1813. He was the successor of the family in Lochkov and his family was very large.  Baptised as Karl Ferdinand Johann Caspar he married Emma Tschapek (1814-1875) and then tenanted a farm nearby in Dobříč. In 1845 he is listed as a member of the pomological society as Herr Carl Brzorad Pächter zu Dobritsch auf dem Gut St.Ivan.[174]

From 1849 at the latest he is a member of the Patriotic Economic Society as a tenant of Dobříč[175], after that he became a tenant of Lochkov farm – at his father’s; later on he took over the farm from his father and then sold it in 1860-1862. This allod[176] estate (230,44 ha) with a mansion, yard, limestone quarries, lime works and a brick plant was bought in 1862 by a large Jewish landowner from Smíchov,  Karel Kirschner, a provincial deputy in 1866.[177]

         The Schematismus for 1881 states for Lochkov an overall land area of over 230 hectares and an assessed value from 1861 at 152 000 gulden. On Karl and Anna Kirschner’s farm in 1881 there can be found marble of all colors, outstanding hydraulic lime, and red pot clay in high yield. Regarding the industry there is (also in Schematismus for 1870) listed a brewery with a kiln for the production of 96 hectoliters, rented to Prague’s Klatscher & Löwy, a brick plant and lime works.

         On the 17th of March 1862 Karl Brzorad’s household is registered in Prague 1275/II. Then they leave for the estate Kleneč pod Řípem, near Roudnice, where Karl is a tenant in 1863. After his death on the 17th of February 1871 Kleneč was sold. On the 12th of June 1872 the household is registered with the police in Prague 315/III. „There was very little money“, his daughter Anna writes, „and after the death of the mother on the 5th of April in Salzburg it was gone“.[178]

         Through his wife Emma and her German speaking family Karl’s family was related to the family of Ernst Rudolf (1783-1860, from 1856 von Wartburg) K.K. Hofburg-inspector / Prager Burghauptmann. His son Josef „Pepi“ Rudolf von Wartburg, was the recipient of a war medal, a medal for civil service and the medal for armed deed - Medaille für die bewaffnete Macht[179]. Later the regional governor in Salzburg is mentioned in the memories of Anna Brzorad, where she wrote, that when they moved from Dobříč, there was a hunt in Lochkov and the Aunts and “Pepi Rudolf, später v. Wartburg“ were sitting at the table.The Tschapeks family had 16 children and Karl’s wife Emma was the youngest. Her oldest sister Lotti married Andreas Schnell. The Tschapeks and the Schnells were two of Prague’s wealthy merchant families. Andreas Schnell’s older sister Marie was Ernst Rudolf von Wartburg’s wife.[180]

Only 11 of Karl’s children lived to be adults. But even the daughters received a careful upbringing and education – German of course – by governesses and resident teachers in this formerly wealthy family. Mostly they became  teachers in German kindergartens, or in families. Here we can see connection with the Delolmes family, where the daughters were distinguished governesses. After all, the visit by the Danish princess to Prague in 1838, as we state elsewhere, lead to the establishment of the first care giving institution for children in Prague, following the Danish example. 

 

Karl had eight daughters and three sons: 1. Emma (1839-1911), 2. Lotti (+1931), 3. Karl (*1842), 4. Pepi (*1843/4), 5. TheklaEtelka“ (1845-1903), 6. Anna (1847-1934), 7. Jaro (*1848), 8. Klara (1850-1924), 9. Zdenka (1850-1924), 10. Gusti (1851-1940) a 11. Ferdi (1855-1930).

 

1. EmmanuelaEmma“ Cichra (1839-1911), „Kindergätnerin“ v Praze, after the sale of Lochkov she stays with Anna and Zdenka in Prague in 44/II. In Národní Listy a daily from 1868 we read:  The children’s little garden founded in Smíchov by Miss E. Brzorádová will seemingly enjoy a great success, as conscious[181] families, seeing the benefits of such an institution, even before its opening enroll their children, boys as well as girls. The manageress Miss E. Brzorádová wrote a leaflet, in which she explained the purpose and the point of this children’s little garden in a very clear way. On Saturday the 13th of June the Czech department was opened in a glorious way, by a lecture by our revered authoress Mrs. Žofie Podlipská at 4 p.m.“ [182]

Later Emma married a secretary to the Prague’s municipality Cichra. Their daughter Marie married a railway clerk Rüttig. Their grandsons were Helmut and Giessbert, who was a professor in Göttingen and Heidelberg.

 

 

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Emma Cichra roz. Brzorád (1839-1911)

 

2. Lotti Brzorad (+1931), Kindergärtnerin in Salzburg, then in Prague with Gusti a Ferdi in Pštrossova street nr. 25.

 

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Lotti Brzorád (+1931), archiv Jiřího Brzoráda

 

3. Karl Brzorád (*1842) was a senior railway clerk. He had 6 children and lived in Prague in Smíchov, later in Vinohrady. His children were 1. Emma (*1875), a kindergarten nurse, who married Mr. Cingria(?) (+1922) (they had 4 children, their daughter married Treves, a writer in Munich); 2. Karoline (1878-1918), a teacher in Vinohrady, Prague; 3. Karl (1879- cca 1937), a secretary in Schiltigheim by Strassburg in France, oo Henriette; 4. Josef (*1881) financial clerk in Plzeň; 5. Jaromir (*1884), injured as a first lieutenant, later a major, a director of the tax authority in Vienna, who married Hildegarda née Bříza; 6. Mariane (*1886), a secondary school teacher of German or Mathematics at the German teachers training school in Prague. She married D/Trinkhauser, a professor in Innsbruck.[183]

 

4. Josef (Pepi) Brzorád (1843/44-1916/7) the head engineer in Rotschild’s company in Waidhofen. With his wife Kathi he had 4 sons:  1. Rudi (Rudolf); 2. Karl, a railway clerk and a manufacturer in Vienna, he had three sons and changed his name to ‘Burghart; 3. Ferdinand; 4. Jaromir,  changed his name into ‘Burghard.[184]

 

5. TheklaEtelkaErben (1845-1903), at her Uncle Vilem’s in Michalovice at first, then at her Uncle Rudolf’s in Mogyoros and then she married the widowed husband of her Aunt Anna born Brzoradova (1833-1865), a school inspector Anton Erben. His children, he had had with Etelka’s Aunt Anna had known her as a cousin Thekla. One of them, Selma Mayr remembers, “Once a cousin Thekla arrived, the daughter of mother’s oldest brother; she had a zither with her and played songs on it in the evening. … In August 1870 our father brought a new mother to us, that is the cousin Thekla, who had already visited us. It struck me as strange, that we were supposed to call her just „Mama“, as before we had simply only called her Thekla.“[185] Thekla and Anton Erbenem had a daughter Anna (1871-1946), who married a regional governor in Völkermarkt and Klagenfurt JUDr. Wilhelm Klebel. The Klebels had three children. Elisabeth, Ernst the mineralogy professor in Salzburg and Wilhelm / Willi who had 8 children. This family is well branched out in Austria today.

 

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Thekla Erben née Brzorádová (1845-1903) with her husband Anton Erben

 

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Thekla (1845-1903) and her daughter Anna (1871-1946) cca 1890[186]

 

6. Anna Brzorád (1847-1934) a language teacher and governess with the noble ladies in Salzburg. She left the extensive narrative “Errinerungen an Lochkov und Dobříč”, describing Karl Brzorád’s family’s life in Dobříči, and also later in Lochkov, where she depicted the last years of her Grandfather – Josef Brzorád, the sale of Lochkov, leaving for Kleneč and mentions also the fates of her siblings. We include the whole text further below after all of her siblings have been listed.

 

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Anna Brzorád (1847-1934), foto 1925[187]

 

7. Jaromír Brzorad (*1848), chief brewer in Posen, then in Rybinsk in Russia, then in Prague at the Schnells’ (U Schnellů).[188] He married Helena Rovinska, and later on her sister. They had 4 children: 1. daughter Anja, a teacher in Upper Austria,  Salzburg, whose husband was called Weng; 2. Jaro(slav); 3. Vladislav / Wladi, who worked for an electrical company in Prague[189]; 4. Helene oo Wiklič in Serbia, they had 2 children.

 

8. Klara Schleussig (1850-1924), a teacher in Vienna married a headteacher Schleussig in Vienna. Their daughter Klára was a nun in Vienna, their son Kamil was also a teacher and married a teacher Margareta (Kreta). They had four children: Ingeborg, Irmgarth, Kreta and Volkmar, who crashed in 1937 as a flying instructor.

 

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Klara Schleussig roz. Brzorádová (1850-1924), roku 1868, archiv Jiří Brzorád[190]

 

9. Zdenka (1850-1924), a graphic artist, xylographer in Leipzig, then in Munich.[191]In the dictionary of Czechoslovak artists by Prokop Toman we read: „Brzorádová Zdeňka *17. 10. 1849 in Dobříši(sic!). A graphic artist, student of Otto Roth in Leipzig; she was active in Munich. She especially made wood engraving of Defreggr, E. K. Liška („DěvčeliduZl. Praha, II, 501) and other.“ The text accompanying the engraving of the drawing „Děvče z lidu“ in Zlatá Praha magazine from 1885 says, „The engraving was done – for the special recommendation by our famous landscapist master Julius Mařák – for „Zlatá Praha“ by a chisel of a Czech native, Miss Zdenka Brzorádová in Munich.“[192]

 

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Zdenka Brzorádová (1850-1924) in 1868, archiv Jiří Brzorád[193]

 

10. FerdinandineFerdi“ (1855-1930), a teacher in Krems, Vienna, later she lived in Prague, in 1925 together with Lotti and Gusti in Pštrossova street nr. 35, II.-1507.

 

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Ferdinandine „Ferdi“ Brzorádová (1855-1930), roku 1868, archiv Jiří Brzorád[194]

 

11. AugusteGustiBrzorádová (1851-1940), a retoucher in Eckert’s photography atelier, from 1873 she works as a retoucher in Salzburg for 2 years and then for a year in Munich. 1877-1878 she was a governess in the noble family of the Strachwitzs in Mamling, Upper Austria and when her charge died, she stayed in the family as the Countess’ companion for some time; 1881-1916 she was the director of the German kindergarten in Vinohrady in Prague. She lived in Pštrossova street nr. 25 and in 1935 she shared some of her family Lochkov memories about Lochkov with a Prague’s paper in an article “Frau Brzorad erzählt.”

 

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Auguste „GustiBrzorádová (1851-1940), roku 1868, archiv Jiří Brzorád[195]

 

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In the article, however, Augusta does not mention her relationship with the distinguished painter Josef Tulka,[196]the painter of the lunettes in the National Theatre in Prague. In a biographical book[197] about him a chapter about his relationship to Augusta Brorádová can be found:

 

Tulka the painter and Augusta Brzorádová (1873-1879)

 

During his studies at the academy of fine arts in Prague Tulka had to struggle to survive, because he did not get any support from his home. Apart from the sources, I have already mentioned, he found satisfactory earnings in the photographic company of H. Eckert in Újezd in Prague’s Lesser Quarter. There he retouched and colored photos for him. There he also met a very young lady Augusta Brzorádová, a daughter from a once wealthy family, related to the Brzoráds of Deutschbrod (Německý Brod, today Havlíčkův Brod) and  those of Nymburk; Otakar Theer the poet’s mother Františka née Brzorádová was a cousin of a second degree[198]. Augusta, born on the 24th August 1851 in Dobříč, Smíchov region, was a daughter of Karl Brzorád, owner of an alod manor farm estate in Lochkov by Radotín (once a seat of  Václav Michna of Vacínov) and Emanuela, born Čapková (Tschapek); they were a Germanized family. In the year 1862 the Brzoráds sold Lochkov and moved to Kleneč under the Říp hill (near Roudnice nad Labem), where they bought a farm “poplužní dvůr”. After the death of the father the family became quite poor. Only Augusta with her two younger sisters remained without provision out of twelve children mostly provided for by working in state or private services. Having found refuge at her mother’s sister, who married a Prague Lesser Quarter merchant Schnell, she would go to Eckert’s atelier, where she met Tulka. He taught her to retouch photographs; She then earned her living that way. In 1873 she and her mother went to her older sister to Salzburg, where she stayed for two years, occupying herself with retouching and the next year she was employed as a retoucher in Munich.

In the years 1877-1878 she was a governess in the noble family of the Strachwitzs in Mamling[199] in Upper Austria. When her charge died, she stayed as the Countess’s companion for some time.

 

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Tante Gusti Brzorád (1851-1940) probably with the Count Strachwitz family, archiv J. Brzorád

 

Then she returned to Prague and having taken a course she was a nanny in a German kindergarten in Královské Vinohrady (today a quarter of Prague) for 35 years. Today she enjoys a modest pension from the institution of social care. Her cousin, Albertine Miksch, a daughter of a doctor in Brandýs nad Labem, being taken into Aunt Schnell’s own family, became after her death an heiress of a decent estate, which she then left to Augusta Brzorádová.

 

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Miksch, archiv J. Brzorád

 

From the contacts in Eckert’s atelier a love affair developed between dreamy Tulka and peaceful, plain-hearted Augusta. It lasted until Tulka’s disappearance. A bulky sheaf of Tulka’s letters from 1873-9 reflects the pure love of both young people.[200] Augusta Brzorádová keeps them as a precious and dear memory of a beloved man, whom she, with a child’s naivety, believes that he still lives and that he might even come back. It is interesting, that Augusta, who in a wealthy family with governesses and resident teachers got the careful upbringing and education – of course in German, only wrote to Tulka in German, whereas Tulka, although his command of German was perfect, wrote her in Czech exclusively. In one letter he says explicitly: »Forgive me, for I only write to you in Czech. I like you in a Czech way. Your golden dear heart will be more tolerant than the Czech and German nations.« Rarely he added a German note, but he did so rather to clarify the meaning of a Czech expression or saying, which she would not understand. If he wanted to express exceptional cordiality, he addressed her, »Milá Mařenko« (Dear little Mary).”[201]

 

After Tulka finished the cycle of the lunets for the National Theatre in Prague he abandoned himself to skepticism and lack of confidence in his talents; he burnt most of his painting sketches and retired to a monastery in an unknown place in Italy. After his disappearance, Augusta could not manage to get in contact with him any more.

 

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Jindřich Eckert’s atelier in Prague in 1873. Augusta Brzorádová and Tulka standing as the first and second from the left.

 

 

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The Memories of Dobříč and Lochkov by Prague

 

Written by Anna Brzorád, 1909[202]

 

Dobříč belonged to Mr. Berger, the owner of St. Ivan, who was very rich. My father rented it from him and I can remember the yard, the residential building and the garden on the left very well.

         Tachlowitz and Hořelitz[203] were very close and the cheerful Pater (Father) Fabat used to come to play tarok with my father. In Hořelitz was Pater Š/Čiška who taught me to read when I was four. When there was a baptism, which occurred eleven times in Dobříč, the dean[204]came too. He was big and stout and had a so called “club foot” and so he had a special, heightened, big shoe, which I would always examine very carefully. Also his umbrella was exceptionally big. Because the baptisms took place at home at that time, the celebration was very important for the other kids. The mother was replaced by Kathi Skalitzky and we kids loved her. She taught us the prayer „Anděl zdrašce (Schutzengel)“ to our guardian angel. On the Sunday after the birth there was a baptism. The priests were invited and Kathi prepared a big, celebratory meal. Before that, though, the white small dressing table was covered with a white scarf of damask; a black iron cross was placed in the middle (Lotti); the branched candlesticks on the right and on the left (Zdenka), bread and holy water. The newly baptized had a little white bed, a small dress with the pattern of a dove, a nice, white tulle cover and white ribbons, which were given as a present by Grandma „Anna Brzorád Delorme“. It was kept with great respect and later it served as a baptism dress for little Anna (Annerl) Klebel, Tekla (Thekla) Erben - Brzorad’s daughter. It was later sent to brother Karl for his firstborn Emma Brzorad.

         At the baptism each child present was given one wax candle in their hand, decorated with flowers and gold. (um als Lichtlpaten zi dieben)

         It is interesting that I do not have many memories of my older siblings. Just once I saw the first, small anteroom, where mother had a small table with sewing equipment by the window. She was sitting at the window, crying, her tears running down her cheeks. Then Emma, Lotti, Carl and Pepi were punished hard. I was standing and staring stiffly. – Then I saw them (the siblings) at the table for learning (Lehrtisch). Horliwitz seemed to be, I think, a friendly teacher, who sharpened a pencil for me and gave me a sheet of paper I doodled on. Anyway, they all started to study very soon, and so we played only towards evenings.

         Jaro, who is one year younger than me and who could run at 9 months – as my father was informed in a letter from my Aunt Anna – was my first companion for games. We had Scottish flannel dresses with wide belts and anAchselträger”.

I saw him crawling while I was running, or he was sitting on the freshly cleaned floor and scratching out the sand and dust he waseating it.

         Emma and Lotti were threading pearls or beads (Schmelz). The other room was both a dining room and a living room. Then mother’s little table for sewing things stood there (in diesem Rau?). My parent’s bedroom was on the left. On the right there was theyellow room“ and I remember this in two moments. My father came early and woke me up: „Anna, get up, you have got two little sisters“. The surprise. – The second memory of theyellow roomis when all 11 children had measles.

         The bathing of the two small creatures was the best entertainment for us. Pouring water with a bit of milk. Klára was fat – Zdenka skinny and very lively; we called her “frog” as a joke. I remember these baptisms clearly. Mr. Turecký, our neighbour, was Zdenka’s Godfather, and Grandpa was Klára’s. The Godmother was probably Aunt Philippine, as she stood as such to all with the exception of Gustis and Ferdis. Grandfather gifted a 10 gulden coinAunt Philippine one ducat. Zdenka got a silver case with a cup and a cutlery.

         I will never forget my first jump either. I climbed up to the stool and jumped – I fell on my nose, which bled and I bawled.

         Our house was next to a garden, in which my ability to reason was awakened. I was intrigued by the view of the trees. The day before, my mother’s friend, Dr. Kotonč’s wife was telling something aboutplanting the teeth“. And seeing now, that trees are „plantedtoo, the fact that the teeths are planted too astonished me.

 

FrequentEinquartierung” - providing accommodation for soldiers would bring a change for us, work for mother and expense for my father. The huge laundry kettle served, after proper cleaning, for boiling dumplings. The fact, that the horses were accommodated here too, also required supplies of hay. One soldier was not satisfied and asked for more hay. Failing to fulfill his wish caused a big surprise at their departure. It was little Gustis’s baptismthe guests were driving into the yard through the gate and at that moment flames spurted from the heap of hay placed under the high poplar tree. Great horror! I was watching the fire fighting from the window. Little sister Gustis’s Godmother was Aunt Lotti.

When another little sister came we were clueless as to what name to give her. At that time we had a young governess from Geneva, Louise Buache. She wrote several names on pieces of paper: Irene, Imene, and finally the name after the English queen Victoria was chosen. I cried then, because I liked the afore mentioned names better.

I remember the arrival of Louise Buache very well too. Dark blue, flowery pattern dress, black velvet short jacket, short hair (after typhoid[205]), and a peacock’s feather at the back of her head as the ending of the hairstyle. Big almond shaped brown eyes, which made a very good impression on us, big nose. Eighteen years. Before her arrival to our house she was a general’s daughter’s companion, whom she called Malinka. As a big reward she gave us two beautiful books – „Contes de Perrault“ (Mr. Perrault’s tales). They were printed in roman letters. One evening I got a book about the bad Owen to read, while Emma, Lotti, Aunt Anna and Pater Ciška were studying French. The book had no pictures so I was just looking at the words and all of a sudden I could see the meaningthe bad Owen kicked up dust  der Schlimme Owen hatte Staub aufgewirbelt“. I looked up and everybody’s eyes were fixed on meit was my first French reading and understanding. From then I was delighted to read fairy tales from the mentioned book:  Blaubart“ - Knight Bluebeard, „DornröschenSleeping Beauty, etc.

 

         And then the relocation came. Father gave up the Dobříč tenure to be a lease holder at my Grandpa’s in Lochkov. Luise Buache with Tekla and Anna went to Lochkov earlier that day. But it was winter and I was rather cold when we came to Grandpa to the castle and Aunt Philippine gave usBouillon“, as she said to Luise. Although I had spoken French and could understand, this word was new to me and I remembered it well.

 

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Lochkov, Das untere Haus 16. 5. 1857 in Tagebuch Anton Erben

 

         The same day there was a big hunt in Lochkov. Luise and I went back to our house, we washed, combed and freshened up and went back for meal in the evening. But Tekla and I were seated at the children’s table. Grandpa, two Aunts, Louise Buache, Pepi Rudolf (later von Wartburg), Wachtel, etc. and the administrator (?) sat at the large table.  

Grandpa was a dignified, serious man, who had a writing desk (counter) for work standing up in his room in the corner at the window. When he snapped the lid, figs and dates for the grandchildren appeared. He had an air pump. Sometimes a sparrow came under the bell glass, the air was pumped away and yet, in the last moment, the bird survived.[206] There was a little devil in a glass, who had to dance for us. Saint Anthony, whom we had to kiss, gave us bites, because it was electrified. On the New Year and other holidays we had to learn, or recite German or French (for Aunt Philippine) poems, or congratulations. Mostly we got a fit of deep anxiety that our minds would go blind. Mommy did not wish this torture. – For the village children Grandpa had books, notebooks and pens, which they got for free. The beggars got an apple instead of a kreuzer. The children were not allowed to come begging. When Grandpa was ill, there was real awe in us, instead of the reverential one because coughing and sneezing were reprimanded by Aunt Philippine. We were not allowed to kiss him anymore. Then he had cancer in his eye and died at 80 years of age.  When he was lying dead in his bed, we had to kneel and pray and kiss his hand. He was put on display on the bier in the big hall, where a wallpaper door was opened to get to the chapel, which was in the projection of the mansion, and where there was room just for an altar, a priest, servers and a big „Todte-Denkbilderwith candles thick as an arm, which were burning on the day, when a mass for the deceased was read. Anna Delorme and two little Aunts Luises, who are buried in Slivenec.

In this very hall I had seen my Grandpa playing chess with Dr. Horst. Also dancing master Link was at our place during holidays and we had dancing lessons from 10 to 12 with this gentle, short man. Nevertheless, only Aunt Anna was adult, Emma and Lotti were under age, Tekla and Anna were children. That did not hinder us from dancing mazurka “grosse Mazur”, “Alliance”, “Menuet” and all the modern dances. At the end there was a ballzu dem Spirk”, Hauptmann and various other young gentlemen came. Tekla in pink, Anna in blue were dancing with elegance; finally I sat down, tired on a sofa – kindly turning down all the dancers and fell asleep. In the morning to my embarrassment I was lying in my bed, to which I was carried by somebody and my clothes were taken off without my knowing about it. “What will my big dancers say?” I thought and went to the breakfast ashamed. Nobody said anythingthat the small lady dancer fell asleep.

 

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Link – dancing master in Prague I, Krocinova Street

 

At that time Grandpa was still alive; later he was put on the bier in that hall. I was trying to cry so hard but I failed to do so. And when I pulled out a handkerchief a number of rose petals fell out of my pocket, which was very embarrassing. As long as Grandpa lived we were not allowed to enter the castle garden and when we were, we were not allowed to pick anything.

However, there was a small garden in front of our house, in which my mother had chestnut trees planted into a circle. These grew fast and we could have these for snack to our utmost delight. Sometimes for dinner. Yes, that was fun. There was singing, laughing and joking. On the right and on the left of the chestnut trees circle was a lawn and in its centre was a flowerbed of moon roses (Monatsrosen). In one corner of the garden was a gazebo with honeysuckle, in another corner jasmine and lilac along the fence, a smell over a smell. On a high wall leading to the big garden, there were pear trees held up and cut, of extraordinary size, calledFrench pears” – they had to be left to ripen in winter and they were the juiciest fruit.

While we were studying upstairs from 8 to 12 and from 2 to 6, mother and the older sisters, the dressmaker Mrs. Urban (Mr. Hauptmann’s widow) or Adolfine Franiek or Albertine Mikschel were in the gazebo diligently sewing new dresses and underclothes, or with the same diligence they were mending the worn out or damaged things.

Sometimes, to mother’s delight, someone would read aloud. The family had a subscription at the Schalek’s in Prague and so several German and French translations for various ages were delivered to stockpile. So in the evenings whilst knitting the stockings we would have a good read: Christoph Schmid translated into French, Rose de Tannenbourg, Henri d'Eichenfels, Lesoufus de Paque.

When Tekla and I grew up, we were entrusted with various duties at which we took turns after 8 days:

1.      At the milking time to knit and check the sale of the milk from 5 to 6 in the morning, 11 – 12 at noon and from 6 to 7 in the evening.

2.      At the time of the harvest we took turns at the barn door and knitting or crocheting we would check the brothers bringing wagons from the fields.

3.      Measuring out the oats for horses.

4.      To be present in the distillery, when the worker in charge measured out the nice-smelling alcohol from the barrels.

5.      To pick the currant, sort it and help with preserving it. To supervise the preparation of plum jam.

6.      In winter to help feather pluck.

 

When the last was finished the maidservants and cowmaids (Kuhmägdemilkmaids?) were rewarded with coffee, bread and “Buchten” – cake with filling.

After the harvest there was wonderful harvest home celebrationErntefest”, which we as children were expecting happily.

The last sheaves and bundles were decorated with colourful ribbons and loaded onto wagons. Men and women smartened up festively were coming into the freshly clean swept yard, came into the house and after a short address they handed a bunch of flowers to my father, brothers and mother. We girls were given wreaths of flowers from our garden and ears of grain from the fields. Afterwards one went back to the yard, where mother gave out bread, Buchten (cake with filling) and coffee. Also a barrel of beer was put at one’s disposal. A barrel organ played and harvesters and children danced around a decorated sheaf. When the mood was rising everybody went to the pub.

Another pleasant duty of ours was picking green pea pods. What we liked even more was the poppy harvest. Mother with all the daughters cut the poppy heads, which were later dried in the loft on canvas, calledBlacht”. Then we sat cheerfully in a circle and poured the poppy seeds from the poppy heads and sometimes also into our stomachs, then into large wooden containers.

A vineyard was in Lochkov too! What a pleasure! The grape harvest! Each child got a knife called “kudlička” with a red or yellow handle. My mother, the governess, the house teacher and the children with the maids, all went to a quarter of an hour distant hillside and there one was pruning diligently and eating.  The rest went to a barrel like bucket, which was transported into father’s cellar in the yard. I have never seen the next procedures. After some time, however, we got sweet must to drink and later at the feasts and holidays there was slightly tart, but genuine wine on the table. These various feasts are also a ray of light in my memories. The Christmas Eve, at the same time the name day of my mother Emanuela, the New Year, my mother’s birthday! With so many children and caring good parents it could not have been otherwise than that a happy bliss ruled these days. Ignoring some minor incidental mistakes, for which one would otherwise be admonished, it was complete harmony and peace of minds.

In the morning, after Christmas Eve I woke up with a blissful feeling. Is it possible? All the thinkable wishes fulfilled! Immaculate cleanliness of the body, clothes, rooms, pleasant warmth, festive meal and the blissful feelings of the loving parents. There were guests all the time, because there were enough aunts, and  male and female cousins. Also the day before the feast Albertine Dr. Kontonč’s wife from Dobříč would help my mother prepare a delicious festive mealKirchweih“ and small cakes to be baked in the oven.

When we grew up a bit, the 12th sister came. My father would call her „vejškrabek[207] jokingly. We all wanted to own her and adopt her. Aunt Therese WeissenbergerDelorme, my Grandmother’s sister, was her Godmother and Ferdl got a rose christening gown. Aunt was a beautiful old lady in a grey silk dress and with snow-white hair. When Leni coiffured it, it flowed as a topcoat all around. I saw this only once and it remains unforgettable for me. In dumb shyness I was watching the old lady, to whom Leni said, ”Such a big girl and she climbs the trees!” I was deeply embarrassed to hear that. I was the perpetrator, because in the cavity of the high plumb tree there was a nest of a shrike whose young attracted me and scared me. With their wide open yellow beaks they were demanding their fodder. Teacher Mazans was passing by and learned about that despicable deed. Emma, who was then 15 years old, went with the great-aunt to Mogyoros where she read the whole collection of letters from my parents and Emma, which gave short but detailed reports about Dobříč and Lochkov.

My sister Emma and Luise Buache were keen on riding for some time and so father bought a pair of pony horses, which would work in the week and Sundays they had a horse blanket fastened with a belt. All the children including the governess, uncle Hauptmann and friends would ride in turns slowly along the path in our large garden.

         At that time plenty of visitors came from Zbraslav: Marie and Clementine, our family doctor’s daughters. The older married a rich Drchota, the younger married von Stransky; both widowed. – Familie Dlabač: the beautiful Gabriele and Fanni. In the end father sold the small horses, because the coachman Stefan knocked out an eye of one of them in anger. (…das Aug ausgeschlagen hatte.)

Swinging was also one of our favourite pastimes. Witanowsky, who was our dear helper with anything, fastened a thick rope on two tall trees and instead of the seat there was a blanket folded more times and then it started. Each child swung 20 – 40 times, Tekla and Anna flew highest. Witanowsky had a go too. That was fun! Many danced with a barrel organ on Saturdays and Sundays, Witanowsky and Heinrich Franiek and Thecla and Anna etc.

When the mown grass was piled up in a heap we would jump across it in the  evening with the moonshine above.

Before 1859 there was a beautiful comet[208] to see and the villagers saw it as the danger of the outbreak of the war, which happened to come. We admired this constellation every night during our walks into theNachtigallentalNightingale Valley or when walking somebody from Zbraslav to Radotín. An ever widening tail coming from a large, burning star, as we said. Across the whole sky! It was awesome. On other evenings we often saw beautiful northern lights (aurora borealis), the whole horizon was as if in one glittering fire.

When Tekla, Lotti and Emma came of age, they took part in dance parties in Zbraslav. After the Italian war around 1860[209] soldiers came to Zbraslav and “officer’s dancing partieswere held. Tekla was very popular, but still very young. Once I was there too but I was only 13. Tecla is 1 ½ year older. First lieutenant Ventour and lieutenant Weismann and others were once invited to our place too. The former one was later often at our place, as you know.

In the time 1860 – 1862 Lochkov was sold and our resettlement to Kleneč by Roudnice nad Labem came.[210] There we were brought low[211] at first, as the saying goes, but then we got used to it. However, during a few years we parted in all directions: Emma: Institut Vogel in Prague, Thecla: a governess at the Meissels by Prague[212], later to uncle Rudolf in Mogyiorosz. Anna Institut Vogel and in year 1868 to the Steinbrechers[213] in Moravská Třebová. Clara and Zdenka to Leipzig.

On the 18th of February 1870 my father died and Kleneč was sold. There was very little money left. With the death of my mother in 1875 - we have run out of it. [214] 

 

14th March 1908[215]

 

The Lochkov yard made a long, wide rectangle. Behind the small residential house of the head brewer, a lumber yard and the mansion[216] was Grandpa’s vegetable garden, which lay a bit lower. The mansion was adjoined by the castle garden, which ran up to the yard and it was equipped by an iron grille. The shorter side of the rectangle was fenced by a barn, a wine cellar, a shed for various coaches and sledges and then again by a barn. - At the corner, by which the long side begins, opposite the castle garden, was a huge entrance gate (leading to the linden avenue, Chuchle and Prague). The watchdog was at the entrance and the residential house of the head thresher Adámek, who lived in the same place with his wife and children. Next to that there was a large distillery factory. Next to that was a huge pile of rubble, or soil and then a large iron gate, which led to the big garden. (A whole field of fruit trees, a gardener’s house and our, children’s little garden.) Next to the gate there was a long cow house and then a high wall which separated the large garden from ourschildren’s one. – The shorter side was bordered by our residential house, its back to the street leading to Slivenec, its front to the small garden.

         Our house adjoined a large entrance gate too; leaning against small houses on the right and on the left. A coachman Knížek lived on the right with his family, on the left a coachman Salaba with his family. Besides was a big stable for horses. The inner area of the yard was divided by two small walls, which had passage entries in its centre, on the right and on the left. Thus there was a narrow path behind our little garden, which lead to the cow house, in front of which was a fixture - the pile of dung and liquid manure fenced by a little wall. The same was in front of the stables.